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Delivery by caesarean section and childhood cancer: a nationwide follow-up study in three countries.
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark , Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV. THL National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
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2014 (English)In: BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology, ISSN 1470-0328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the association between delivery by caesarean section and risk of childhood cancer.

DESIGN:

A population-based, follow-up study using register data from three countries.

SETTING:

Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

POPULATION:

Children born in Denmark (1973-2007), Sweden (1973-2006) and Finland (randomly selected sample of 90%, 1987-2007; n = 7 029 843).

METHODS:

Exposure was delivery by caesarean section and the outcome was childhood cancer diagnosis. Follow-up started from birth and ended at the first of the following dates: cancer diagnosis, death, emigration, day before 15th birthday or end of follow-up. Cox regression was used to obtain hazard ratios.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Childhood cancer diagnosis.

RESULTS:

A total of 882 907 (12.6%) children were delivered by caesarean section. Of these, 30.3% were elective (n = 267 603), 35.9% unplanned (n = 316 536) and 33.8% had no information on planning (n = 298 768). Altogether, 11 181 children received a cancer diagnosis. No evidence of an increased risk of childhood cancer was found for children born by caesarean section (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 0.99, 1.11). No association was found for any major type of childhood cancer, or when split by the type of caesarean section (elective/unplanned).

CONCLUSION:

The evidence does not suggest that caesarean section is a risk factor for the overall risk of childhood cancer and possibly not for subtypes of childhood cancer either

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
Keyword [en]
Caesarean Section, Childhood Cancer, Follow-Up Studies, Mode of Delivery, Risk
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:norden:org:diva-2568DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.12667PubMedID: 24521532OAI: oai:DiVA.org:norden-2568DiVA: diva2:705154
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2014-03-25Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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Language
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