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Socio-economic gradient in food selection and diet quality among 70-year olds.
Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
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2007 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 11, no 6, 466-73 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess social disparities in food choices and diet quality in a population of 70-year old Swedes.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study among participants in the 2000 Gerontological and Geriatric Population Studies in Goteborg.

PARTICIPANTS: A representative population of men (n=233) and women (n=321) from Goteborg, a city on the south western coast of Sweden.

METHODS: One hour diet history interviews were performed and 35 specific foods and food groups were identified; in addition a diet quality index (DQI) was calculated. Differences in food choices and diet quality scores were tested across educational and socio-economic index categories (SEI).

RESULTS: Men with higher education and SEI had higher diet quality scores than those with lower socio-economic status, while no differences in DQI were noted in women. Further analysis of women based on their husband's occupational group also yielded no differences in diet quality. When studying individual foods, socio-economic differences were observed in women and men.

CONCLUSIONS: Selection of food varies by education and occupational status in both sexes although socio-economic disparities in diet quality were observed in men only.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 11, no 6, 466-73 p.
Keyword [en]
Diet Quality Index, Education, Gerontology, Nitrition, Socio-Economic Status
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:norden:org:diva-3400PubMedID: 17985061OAI: oai:DiVA.org:norden-3400DiVA: diva2:748253
Available from: 2014-09-18 Created: 2014-09-18 Last updated: 2014-09-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Socio-economic Status and Health in Women: Population-based studies with emphasis on lifestyle and cardiovascular disease
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socio-economic Status and Health in Women: Population-based studies with emphasis on lifestyle and cardiovascular disease
2005 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis was to investigate socio-economic status in relation to morbidity and mortality, in particular cardiovascular disease among women using data from two population based studies from Sweden. The secondary aim was to explore mechanisms potentially linking socio-economic status to health, assessing for example dental, dietary, and lifestyle factors. Samples: The Population Study of Women in Gothenburg Sweden was begun in 1968-69. A representative random sample of 1,622 women was selected according to date of birth and within the strata 38, 46, 50, 54, and 60 years of age; the participation rate was 90 percent. The Gerontological and Geriatric Population Studies in Gothenburg (H-70) are based on representative samples of 70-year olds from Göteborg, Sweden who participated in a series of cross sectional and longitudinal studies between1971 and 2000. Participation rates ranged from 86 percent for men and 83 percent for women in the 1901/2 birth cohort to 65 percent for men and 69 percent for women in the 1930 birth cohort. Main results: High socio-economic status was associated with a decreased risk for cardiovascular disease [RR 0.49; CI 0.24 – 0.99] in middle aged women independently of risk factors such as smoking and obesity;moreover opposing monotonic trends were seen for mortality from cancer and cardiovascular disease in relation to socio-economic status. Tooth loss, a proxy for cumulative lifetime oral infection was also associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease in women independently of socio-economic factors such as the husband’s occupational category, income, and educational level. Among 70-year old cohorts, later-born women were heavier and had higher body mass index than earlier-born women within the high education group only. However, secular increases in waist-hip ratio were seen in both educational groups. Compared to earlier-born cohorts of 70-year old men, later-born cohorts had higher body mass index and cholesterol levels across social strata, and heart disease and diabetes mellitus became more prevalent. Among the elderly, secular trends indicated greater improvements in cardiovascular risk factors among women than men, with exception to smoking and alcohol consumption. Diet quality and food selection were assessed in relation to socio-economic status in the youngest cohort of 70-year olds born in 1930. Socio-economic disparities in diet quality were detected in men but not in women. Conclusions: From a public health perspective, it is suggested that risk factor patterns should be investigated in association with socio-economic status in order to expose health inequalities, and to develop more equitable interventions for cardiovascular disease prevention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Nordic School of Public Health NHV Göteborg, Sweden, 2005. 86 p.
Series
NHV Reports and Doctor of Public Health-Theses, ISSN 0283-1961 ; Report 2005:3
Keyword
cardiovascular disease, dental health, diet, epidemiology, obesity, women, socio-economic status.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:norden:org:diva-3401 (URN)91-7997-093-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-09-18 Created: 2014-09-18 Last updated: 2014-09-18Bibliographically approved

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