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  • 1. Andersen, Peter B.
    et al.
    Soren, Santosh K.
    The Bodo of Assam: Revisiting a Classical Study from 19502015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bodo (or Boros) are one of the indigenous tribal peoples of Assam. During colonial times they resisted Christianization and in recent decades they have been involved both in interethnic violence and separatist insurgencies. Much research has gone into understanding the Boros and their aspirations but an issue has been that earlier accounts of this once-animist people are meagre and date from the colonial period. The rediscovery and publication of the ethnographic material based on fieldwork carried out by Halfdan Siiger among the Boros in 1949–50 is thus hugely important. Siiger’s manuscript is unique, offering detailed descriptions of the social and ritual life of the Boros and new insights into the traditions and myths as they were told in the village he studied before the transformation of religious life in recent decades. Thanks to Siiger’s diligent translation and interpretation, the manuscript also preserves a number of ritual formulas and songs in the Boro language. Siiger’s manuscript is given even greater relevance by the inclusion of more recent material contributed by the editors and other contemporary scholars. In addition, his original photos are augmented by new photos from the village and by rare images from the collections of the National Museum of Denmark. 

  • 2. Badhwar, Ingvild
    The Elephant-shaped Hole in the Universe:: A literary analysis of Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things2016In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 3, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, I read Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things as a melodrama in order to explore the relationship between the subaltern and the world of everyday life. I draw upon Spivak’s conception of the subaltern, her lack of voice and location within both everyday life and the narrative of history. I argue that the main character, Ammu—not speaking the language of everyday life, yet desperately desiring to express herself—is forced to resort to melodramatics, bolstering her incomprehensibility and leaving her even more isolated. I discuss the relationship between post-colonial studies, melodrama, everyday language, skepticism, innocence and knowledge, representations, and the subaltern’s opportunity to regain her voice in order to tell her own story.

  • 3. Bangsbo, Ellen
    Teaching and Learning in Tibet: A Review of Research Policy Publications2006Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of schooling and education for Tibetan children in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) is the focus of increasing national and international attention. Here, special attention has been given to the concept of ‘quality education’. One should be aware that this concept is understood differently by different groups. Educationalists and NGOs with programmes in Tibet view ‘quality education’ from the international perspective of methodology and pedagogy; here, the aim is to teach children to think independently. In contrast, Chinese authorities promote ‘quality education’ as an antidote to ‘exam-oriented education’ and as a means to support nationalistic, patriotic and moral education. The challenge is to bridge these two views.

    To this end, Teaching and Learning in Tibet provides an unbiased and comprehensive guide to documents and publications on schooling and education in Tibet dealing with issues relating to ‘quality education’, teaching and curriculum, bi- and trilingual teaching policies, teachers’ education, ‘key-schools’, access to school, and other challenges related to schooling in Tibet.

  • 4. Bankoff, Greg
    et al.
    Swart, Sandra
    Breeds of Empire: The ’Invention’ of the Horse in Southeast Asia and Southern Africa 1500-19502011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ships of empire carried not just merchandise, soldiers and administrators but also equine genes from as far a field as Europe, Arabia, the Americas, China and Japan. In the process, they introduced horses into parts of the world not native to that animal in historical times. As a result, horses in Thailand, the Philippine Horses, the Cape Horse in South Africa and the Basotho Pony in the mountain kingdom of Lesotho share a genetic lineage with the horse found in the Indonesian archipelago.

    This book explores the ‘invention’ of specific breeds of horse in the context of imperial design and colonial trade routes. Here, it focuses on the introduction, invention and use of the horse in Thailand, the Philippines and southern Africa as well as examining its roots and evolution within Indonesia. In addition, it examines the colonial trade in horses within the Indian Ocean and discusses the historiographical and methodological problems associated with writing a more species or horse-centric history.

    This is a fascinating study that will appeal not only to scholars but also to the broad horse-reading public interested in all things equine.

  • 5. Becker, John
    Pattern and Loom: A Practical Study of the Development of Weaving Techniques in China, Western Asia and Europe2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When John Becker’s Pattern and Loom was posthumously published in 1987, the work was hailed as an important work that revealed much new knowledge on the development of weaving techniques across the centuries from China through to Europe. The key to the book’s almost forensic investigation of its subject was the author himself, a Danish damask weaver with a lifetime’s practical experience in his craft and an intimate knowledge of weaving techniques that allowed him to decipher, experiment and interpret original techniques from small remnants of surviving material. Long out of print, the work has been tidied and reset by Becker’s collaborator on the original work, the sinologist Don Wagner.

     

  • 6.
    Bruun, Ole
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NIAS - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies.
    Fengshui in China: Geomantic Divination between State, Orthodoxy and Popular Religion2011 (ed. 2nd ed.)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For well over a century, Chinese fengshui - or 'geomancy' - has interested Western laymen and scholars. Today, hundreds of popular manuals claim to use its principles in their advice on how people can increase their wealth, happiness, longevity, etc. This study is quite different, approaching fengshui from an academic angle. The focus is on fengshui's significance in China, but the recent history of its reinterpretation in the West is also depicted.

    The author argues that fengshui serves as an alternative tradition of cosmological knowledge, which is used to explain a range of everyday occurrences in rural areas such as disease, mental disorders, accidents and common mischief. Although Chinese authorities have opposed the tradition for centuries, nonetheless it has been used by almost everyone as an aspect of popular cosmology. Opposing the Chinese collectivist ethos and moralizing from above, fengshui represents an alternative vision of reality, while interpreting essential Chinese values in a way that sanctions selfish motivations and behaviour.

    The study includes a historical account of fengshui over the last 150 years augmented by the results of anthropological fieldwork on contemporary practices in two Chinese rural areas. Aiming to eschew Western intellectual preconceptions and to penetrate the confused mass of old texts and divergent local practices, the book will be of interest to all scholars seeking to understand an undercurrent of modern China's transformation.

  • 7. Bruun, Ole
    et al.
    Narangoa, Li
    Mongols From Country to City: Floating Boundaries, Pastoralism and City Life in the Mongol Lands2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Analyses cultural change not only in Mongolia but also in the wider Mongol lands in China and Russia.

    • Brings focus and a wealth of new material not previously published to a previously sparse and fragmented field of study.

    • Combines the work of several internationally recognized scholars with that of a group of young but innovative new scholars

  • 8. Buescher, Hartmut
    Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts: Early Acquisitions and the Nepal Collection2010Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This first-ever catalogue in English of the Danish National Library's rich Sanskrit holdings analyses and describes three of the manuscript collections held by the library.

    The first is the Codices Sanscriti, collected in the early nineteenth century by the pioneer comparative linguist, Rasmus Rask, comprises both palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, most written in either Bengali, Telugu or Sinhalese script.

    The second - the Codices Indici - was collected by the surgeon and botanist, Nathanael Wallich (well-known for his involvement in the foundation of the Indian Museum and Botanical Garden atCalcutta). Mostly written in Bengali script on locally produced country paper, most of these codices pertain to the genre of Ayurveda.

    The third and largest collection originates from Nepal and was collected in the 1950s by the cultural anthropologist Werner Jacobsen. Its highly heterogenous nature reflects the fact that Jacobsen had an ethnographical curator's eye for curious objects.

    Together these comprise a rich offering to philologists, anthropologists and historians of religion, art and iconography.

  • 9. Børdahl, Vibeke
    Wu Song Fights the Tiger: The Interaction of Oral and Written Traditions in the Chinese Novel, Drama and Storytelling2013Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of Chinese literary studies has long been on the written word even though Chinese fiction and drama have strong oral roots and have been shaped by an interplay between oral and written traditions. The culmination of decades working on this issue – and using as its lens the story about how the legendary hero Wu Song killed a tiger with his bare hands – this volume explores Chinese oral professional storytelling and its relations with literary culture in the past and present.

  • 10. Børdahl, Vibeke
    et al.
    Li, FeiYing, Huang
    Four Masters of Chinese Storytelling: Full-length Repertoires of Yangzhou Storytelling on Video2004Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Offers access to and brings alive unique materials on the Chinese storytelling traditions.

    • First time that storytellers? repertoires are registered in theirentirety.

    • Useful for students of Chinese culture by serving as a bilingual guide to the great masterworks of the Chinese novel (Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey to the West).

  • 11. Børdahl, Vibeke
    et al.
    Wan, Margaret B.
    The Interplay of the Oral and the Written in Chinese Popular Literature2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    • Examines the interrelationship between oral (or performing) and written traditions in Chinese popular literature
    • Offers enquiries into new material and gives astonishing responses to old controversies
    • Provides interdisciplinary perspectives on Chinese popular entertainment literature from the Ming dynasty to the present
    • Makes an excellent contribution to the literature in its field.

     

  • 12. Chandler, David
    et al.
    Kent, Alexandra
    People of Virtue: Reconfiguring Religion, Power and Moral Order in Cambodia Today2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much attention has been given to the ‘killing fields’ of Cambodia, far less to how the country can recover and heal itself after such an experience. Crucial to this process has been the formation of a new moral order in Cambodia and hence the revival of religion in the country.

    Certainly, the regeneration of the ritual life of a community may offer ways for people to formulate and relate to their collective stories through symbolism that recalls a shared cultural origin. However, this process requires that the representatives of religion and of morality do have credibility and moral authority, something that may be called into question by their past and present involvement in hegemonic political and secular affairs.

    The importance of this volume, therefore, is not only that it contributes to the new interest in religion in Cambodia but also because it places the religious revival in a nuanced social, cultural and political context and shows how Cambodia pursues order in large part through reference to her past.

  • 13. Christensen, Asger
    Aiding Afghanistan: The Background and Prospects for Reconstruction in a Fragmented Society1995Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examines how the structure and dynamics of Afghan society shaped not only earlier relations between state and society but also the resistance struggle and civil war, and still affect international efforts towards the country's reconstruction.

  • 14. Connors, Michael Kelly
    Democracy and National Identity in Thailand2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This revised and updated edition of the widely praised Democracy and National Identity in Thailand provides readers with a fascinating discussion of how debates about democracy and national identity in Thailand have evolved from the period of counter-insurgency in the 1960s to the current (post-coup) period.

    Focusing on state- and civil society-centred democratic projects, Connors uses original Thai language sources to trace how the Thai state developed a democratic ideology that meshed with idealized notions of Thai identity, focusing on the monarchy. The book moves on to explore how non-state actors have mobilized notions of democracy and national identity in their battle against authoritarian rule.

    A new chapter explores the fate of the democratic project under the Thaksin regime. Using an approach applicable to the study of other democratizing societies, Democracy and National Identity in Thailand invites readers to explore democratic ideology as a form of power aimed at creating ideal citizens able to support elite national projects.

  • 15. Couderc, Pascal
    et al.
    Sillander, Kenneth
    Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation, and Social Immortality2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While death, eschatology and exotic indigenous deathways have long held a privileged position in the ethnographic and popular literature on Borneo, ancestors have remained a strangely neglected topic. This volume fills this lacuna by presenting a collection of essays on ancestors in Borneo societies written by anthropologists with extensive experience in the field and drawing on new scholarship in kinship and animism studies.

    Belying the unimportance of ancestors in the literature, the essays document a complex significance of ancestors in Borneo religion and social life. Ancestors appear in a variety of manifestations and contexts, including as guests or distant beneficiaries of offerings in mortuary and community rituals, as village guardians and personal protecting spirits, as assistants in curing rituals and warfare, as unsolicited visitors in dreams and involuntary possession, and as sources of political authority, cultural legitimacy, and collective identity in public discourse. The pattern of relating to ancestors that emerges from this close collaborative effort differs from classic ethnographic representations of ancestor worship based on Sino-African material, and broadens the theoretical and comparative understanding of the subject.

    Exploring at depth complex questions about the constitution of ancestorship and how ancestral status is established – and the role in this regard of death, kinship, prowess, morality and ritual – this volume will not just be of interest to regional specialists but also will enrich the general anthropological theory of ancestors, kinship and religion.

  • 16. Cramb, R. A.
    Land and Longhouse: Agrarian Transformation in the Uplands of Sarawak2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the role of community, market and state in the historic transformation of upland livelihoods in Southeast Asia. Focusing on the Saribas Iban of Sarawak, the book combines in-depth, generation-long village case studies with an account of changes in land use and tenure at the regional level spanning a century and a half. This analysis demonstrates that, far from being passive victims of globalization, the Iban have been active agents in their own transformation, engaging with both market and state while retaining community values and governance.

    Dr Cramb makes a significant new contribution to debates about economic, social and environmental change and conflict in upland Southeast Asia. His book offers a fascinating, empirically rich account of interest to scholars, development practitioners and the general reader alike.

  • 17. De Marchi, Serena
    The EU’s Human Rights Dialogue with China:: Quiet diplomacy and its limit2016In: Asia in Focus, ISSN 2446-0001, no 3, p. 58-59Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18. Earl, Catherine
    Vietnam’s New Middle Classes: Gender, Career, City2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume explores the social consequences of macro-economic reform introduced in Vietnam more than a quarter of a century ago through a focus on young women graduates who hope to find success in Ho Chi Minh City’s growing graduate labour market. They are part of Vietnam’s new middle class, an educated and affluent segment of society growing with the rapid urbanization of Vietnam’s major cities.

              Drawing on a rich person-centred ethnography supplemented with middle-class Vietnamese women’s published autobiographies, it reveals how opportunities for professional work, further education, and leisure lifestyling attract young migrants, particularly female graduates, to Vietnam’s mega-urban Southeast region. Centred on Ho Chi Minh City, it argues that Vietnam’s Southeast enables young women, so long as they remain single, to realize aspirations for betterment that affect not only their own lives, but those of their families and communities who remain in rural Vietnam. It highlights the socio-cultural and material benefits realized through remittances received from urban daughters to emphasize the salience of kinship during periods of social transformation.

              The volume concludes with a wide-ranging look at the emergence of middle classes in Pacific Asia in order to locate the Vietnamese new middle class within a globalizing context.

  • 19. Eerolainen, Leena
    Oh the horror!: Genre and the fantastic mode in Japanese cinema2016In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 3, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ever since the emergence of the so-called J-horror in the late 1990s and early 21st century, Japanese horror cinema has been a staple of both Japanese studies and film studies. Researchers, critics and film directors alike have been keen to observe and analyze the popularity and roots of the phenomenon. While many previous studies work extremely well on a detailed case-study level, there are many moments of confusion related to the general understanding of what horror actually is. My aim in this essay is to point out the various contradictions and differing opinions and, ultimately, to propose that we take an alternative outlook altogether. I suggest we approach the subject matter from the viewpoint of the fantastic, which I see as a mode visible in various genres including but not limited to, horror. This will position Japanese horror cinema as one element within the long tradition of fantastic representations in Japanese (popular) culture, both offering a new approach to old works and introducing new works as interesting analyzable content.

  • 20. Eklöf, Stefan
    Pirates in Paradise: A Modern History of Southeast Asia’s Maritime Marauders2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tracing the development of piracy in Southeast Asia from the eighteenth century until today, this book provides profound insights into contemporary terrorism, piracy and transnational organized crime in the region.

    Since the late twentieth century, piracy has returned to the world's oceans with a vengeance. Worst hit is Southeast Asia where thousands of people have lost their lives at the hands of pirates in the last 25 years. Here, oil tankers, cargo ships, passenger vessels, fishing boats and pleasure yachts all have been targets of ruthless attacks.

    But who are these modern sea robbers who continue to infest the waters of Southeast Asia? Why have they not been suppressed by the security forces of the region? How serious is the problem for international shipping, for fishermen and for governments? This book is the first attempt to address these questions in a comprehensive and integrated manner.

  • 21. Endres, Kirsten W.
    Performing the Divine: Mediums, Markets and Modernity in Urban Vietnam2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vietnam in the last two decades has experienced not only market reform and significant economic growth but also a related, symbiotic revival of popular religion. It is no surprise, then, that popular beliefs and rituals that once were attacked as wasteful and superstitious have again become a conspicuous feature of contemporary urban and rural life.

    A new blossoming of spirit mediumship has been part of this revival, not least that involving ritual possession by the deities of the Four Palace Pantheon, which this study based in urban Hanoi brings to life with a deft handling of complex theory, historical research, ethnographic material and analysis.

    This is indeed a sojourn into the world of mediumship in contemporary urban Vietnam - a spirited world full of colour, laughter, music and ritual dance that operates according to its own rules and principles - but it is also an insightful study of spirituality, performance, gender and heritage, one that highlights the fluidity of ritual practice and contestations of ritual performance among practitioners.

  • 22.
    Engman, Riikka
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Culture Point.
    Focus Projects: Effects and Results of Funding2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23. Falk, Monica Lindberg
    Making Fields of Merit: Buddhist Female Ascetics and Gendered Orders in Thailand2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Religion plays a central role in Thai society with Buddhism intertwined in the daily lives of the people. Religion also plays an important role in establishing gender boundaries. The growth in recent decades of self-governing nunneries (samnak chii) and the increasing interest of Thai women in a Buddhist monastic life are notable changes in the religion–gender dynamic.

    This anthropological study addresses religion and gender relations through the lens of the lives, actions and role in Thai society of an order of Buddhist nuns (mae chii). It presents an unique ethnography of these Thai Buddhist nuns, examines what it implies to be a female ascetic in contemporary Thailand and analyses how the ordained state for women fits into the wider gender patterns found in Thai society. The study also deals with the nuns’ agency in creating religious space and authority for women. In addition, it raises questions about how the position of Thai Buddhist nuns outside the Buddhist sangha affects their religious legitimacy and describes recent moves to restore a Theravada order of female monks.

     

  • 24. Fischer, Johan
    Proper Islamic Consumption: Shopping among the Malays in Modern Malaysia2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The West has seen the rise of the organic movement. In the Muslim world, a similar halal movement is rapidly spreading. Exploring consumption practices in urban Malaysia, this book shows how diverse forms of Malay middle-class consumption (of food, clothing and cars, for example) are understood, practised and contested as a particular mode of modern Islamic practice.

    The book illustrates ways in which the issue of ‘proper Islamic consumption’ for consumers, the marketplace and the state in contemporary Malaysia evokes a whole range of contradictory Islamic visions, lifestyles and debates articulating what Islam is or ought to be. Its rich empirical material on everyday consumption in a local context will reinvigorate theoretical discussions about the nature of religion, ritual, the sacred and capitalism in the new millennium.

  • 25. Fjeld, Heidi
    Commoners and Nobles: Hereditary Divisions in Tibet2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Written by one of the few scholars who has been able to conduct long-term fieldwork in the TAR, this study explores how Tibetans manoeuvre within two contradictory value systems - those of old Tibet and the new PRC - balancing between ideals and pragmatism.

    More specifically, it asks how and why it is that the social categories of pre-communist Lhasa persist and are made relevant in daily life despite decades of Chinese rule and the comprehensive restructuring of Tibetan society. More specifically, particular attention is given to the former nobility of Lhasa and their ascribed role as custodians of Tibetan culture.

  • 26. Frans, Gregersen
    et al.
    Josephson, Olle
    Godenhjelm, Sebastian
    Londen, Monica
    Östman, Jan-Ola
    Kristinsson, Ari Páll
    Bernhardsson, Haraldur
    Røyneland, Unn
    Kristoffersen, Gjert
    Kristiansen, Marita
    Thøgersen, Jacob
    Salö, Linus
    Hvor parallelt: Om parallellspråkighet på Nordens universitet2014Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [da]

    Sprogpolitik er blevet et hot emne på de nordiske universiteter. Det skyldes først og fremmest at brugen af engelsk har bredt sig til snart sagt alle områder, og at det i sig selv kalder på bevidst og informeret stillingtagen. I denne bog kan man finde materialer til at planlægge, iværksætte, evaluere og ændre et universitets sprogpolitik, særlig hvornår man bør bruge hvilket sprog og hvilke virkninger det kan have. Bogen er skrevet på tre nordiske sprog, dansk, svensk og norsk. Den kan således læses af alle i Norden. Hovedstammen i bogen er de såkaldte landerapporter hvor forholdene i de fem nordiske stater belyses så grundigt som det foreliggende datamateriale tillader det. Alle landerapporter forholder sig til fire fokuspunkter: formulerede sprogpolitikker, sprogvalg i publikationer, sprogvalg i uddannelserne og internationalisering af disse i form af studerende (og ansatte) fra andre lande end de nordiske. Men herudover findes der en generel sprogpolitisk indledning og en gennemgang af hvilke forhold man skal tage hensyn til når man vælger undervisningssprog. Alle bogens elementer kan læses selvstændigt og vil også kunne findes som selvstændige publikationer.

  • 27. Frisk, Sylva
    Submitting to God: Women and Islam in Urban Malaysia2009Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, Malaysia has been profoundly changed by forces of globalization, modernization and industrialization, as well as by a strong Islamization process.  It has been argued, that the position of Malay women in society has worsened.  This study however, challenges that assumption through exploration of the everyday religious practices of pious women within Kuala Lumpur’s affluent, Malay middle class.

    Here, women play an active part in the Islamization process not only through heightened personal religiosity but also by organizing and participating in public programmes of religious education. By organizing new forms of collective ritual and assuming new public roles as religious teachers, these religiously educated women are transforming the traditionally male-dominated gendered space of the mosque and breaking men’s monopoly over positions of religious authority.  This book challenges both preconceptions of the nature of Islamization as well as current theories of female agency and power.

  • 28. Gimpel, Denise
    et al.
    Bailey, Paul
    Creative Spaces: Seeking the Dynamics of Change in China2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    China is in flux but - as argued by the contributors to this volume - change is neither new to China nor is it unique to that country; similar patterns are found in other times and in other places. Indeed, on the basis of concrete case studies (ranging from Confucius to the Vagina Monologues, from Protestant missionaries to the Chinese avant-garde) and drawing on theoretical insights from different disciplines, the contributors assert that change may be planned but the outcome can never be predicted with any confidence. Rather, there exist creative spaces within which people, ideas and systems interact with uncertain outcomes.

    As such, by identifying a more sophisticated approach to the complex issues of change, cultural encounters and so-called globalization, this volume not only offers new insights to scholars of other geo-cultural regions; it also throws light on the workings of our ‘global’ and ‘transnational’ lives today, in the past and in the future.

  • 29. Goscha, Christopher E.
    Historical Dictionary of the Indochina War (1945-1954): An International and Interdisciplinary Approach2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This first historical dictionary in English of the Indochina War (1945–54) provides the most comprehensive account to date of one of the most important conflicts of the twentieth century. Using over 1,600 personally researched and crafted entries, Goscha provides in-depth, expert coverage of the Indochina War in all its dimensions.

    A succinct historical introduction frames the dictionary. Rather than settling for a strictly politico-military account of the war, the author adopts a path-breaking dual international and interdisciplinary approach. Thus, readers will not only find information on politics and military campaigns; they will also discover the remarkable impact this war had on intellectual, social, cultural, economic and artistic domains in France, Indochina and elsewhere. Indeed, rather than limiting the dictionary to the French and their Vietnamese adversaries, Goscha explores the internationalization of this conflict from its beginning in September 1945 at Ba Dinh square in Hanoi to its end around the Cold War conference table in Geneva in July 1954. Similarly, while most authors focus on the French Fourth Republic and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the two main protagonists in this conflict, Goscha makes it clear that a myriad of other non-communist Vietnamese, Lao and Cambodian nationalists were deeply involved in this war and its outcome.

    In addition to its 1,600 entries, the dictionary contains a succinct historical introduction, selected bibliography, maps, illustrations, and tables. A massive work of outstanding scholarly quality and lasting value, this is a reference tool that will be invaluable for researchers, students and anyone else interested to better understand the complexity of this tragic conflict.

     

  • 30. Goscha, Christopher E.
    et al.
    Ivarsson, Søren
    Contesting Visions of the Lao Past: Lao Historiography at the Crossroads2003Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the birth of any nation is always more complicated than official historiographies purport, the complex positioning of Laos at the crossroads of a wide range of historical, geographical and cultural currents makes this particularly true. It is well known that Laos’ emergence as a modern nation-state in the 20th century owed much to a complex interplay of internal and external forces.

    This book argues that the historiography of Laos needs also to be understood in this wider context. Not only do the contributors to this volume consider how the Lao have written their own nationalist and revolutionary history ‘on the inside’, they also examine how others – the French, Vietnamese, and Thais – have tried to write the history of Laos ‘from the outside’ for their own political ends. Rather than divorcing these two trends, this book demonstrates that they were inter-linked. Nationalist historiography, like the formation of the nation-state, did not emerge within a nationalist vacuum but was rather contested from the inside and the outside. The volume’s approach has applications and implications far beyond Laos and shows that studying small countries counts.

  • 31. Gravers, Michael
    Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the image of modern Myanmar/Burma tends to be couched in human rights terms - and especially of a heroic Aung San Suu Kyi opposing an oppressive military regime - in reality there are several conflicts with ethnic and religious dimensions, as well as political and ideological differences between the opposition and the ruling military regime. This is not surprising in a country where 30% of the population and much of the land area are non-Burman, and where contradictory tendencies towards regional separatism versus unitary rule have divided the people since before independence.

    In what is probably the most comprehensive study of Burma’s ethnic minorities to date, this volume discusses the historical formation of ethnic identity and its complexities in relation to British colonial rule as well as to the modern State, the present situation of military rule and its policy of ‘myanmarfication’. Changes of identity in exile and due to religious conversion are analysed and discussed.

    Finally, the book deals with relevant and recent anthropological and sociological theoretical discussions on the ethnic identity, boundaries and space of all the main ethnic groups in Burma. It probes into the complexity and diversity and it provides more details and up-to-date information than previously collected in one volume.

  • 32. Harriden, Jessica
    The Authority of Influence: Women and Power in Burmese History2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the relationship between gender and power in Burmese history from pre-colonial times to the present day and aims to identify the sources, nature and limitations of women’s power. The study takes as its starting point the apparent contradiction that, though Burmese women historically enjoyed relatively high social status and economic influence, for the most part they remained conspicuously absent from positions of authority in formal religious, social and political institutions. The book thus examines the concept of ‘family’ in Burmese political culture, and reveals how some women were able to gain political influence through their familial connections with powerful men, even while cultural models of ‘correct’ female behaviour prevented most women from attaining official positions of political authority.

    The study also considers how various influences – Buddhism, colonialism, nationalism, modernisation and militarism – shaped Burmese concepts of gender and power, with important implications for how women were able to exercise social, economic and political influence. The book explores how the effects of prolonged armed conflict, economic isolation and political oppression have constrained opportunities for women to attain power in contemporary Burma, and examines opportunities opened up by the pro-democracy movement and recent focus on women's issues and rights for women to exercise influence both inside Burma and in exile.

  • 33. Heimer, Maria
    et al.
    Thøgersen, Stig
    Doing Fieldwork in China2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doing fieldwork inside the PRC is an eye-opening but sometimes also deeply frustrating experience. Fieldwork-based studies form the foundation for our understanding of Chinese politics and society, but there are conspicuously few detailed descriptions in the China literature of how people actually do their fieldwork, and of the problems they encounter. This lack of public methodological debate not only undermines academic standards of openness: it also stalls constructive discussion on coping strategies to shared problems, and it leaves graduate students going to the field for the first time with a feeling of being the only ones to encounter difficulties.

    In this volume scholars from around the world reflect on their own fieldwork practice in order to give practical advice and discuss more general theoretical points. The contributors come from a wide range of disciplines such as political science, anthropology, economics, media studies, history, cultural geography and sinology. The book also contains an extensive bibliography.

    This work is of relevance to post graduate students from the social sciences and humanities who plan to do fieldwork in China; to experienced scholars who are new to the China field; and to experienced China scholars with an interest in methodological issues.

  • 34. Helgesen, Geir
    Introduction2015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 1, p. 1-1Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35. Hellman, Jörgen
    Performing the Nation: Cultural Politics in New Order Indonesia2003Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In sharp contrast to today’s disorder was the apparent cohesion and stability of Indonesia during much of the New Order period (1965–98). While Suharto’s authoritarian rule was significant, the regime’s cultural policies also played their part. Ethnic, religious and regional sentiments were to be channelled into the field of art rather than being expressed in terms of class, religion or separatism. At the same time, culture was used to help develop a national Indonesian identity.

    This theme is explored by this study, which focuses on the efforts of a group of young art students based at the Bandung Academy of Performing Arts to revitalize traditional Longser theatre. The interaction between the artists and regime and their often-differing ideas about identity, the role of art and cultural traditions in Indonesia offers valuable insights into the underlying dynamics of the country’s current condition.

  • 36. Hennessey, John
    Creating a Colonial Consciousness?: Reflections on Audience Reception at the Tokyo Colonization Exposition of 19122015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 2, p. 15-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well-recognized in historical scholarship that in both Japan and the West, expositions were an important site for the dissemination of colonial propaganda in the decades surrounding the turn of the twentieth century. Nevertheless, the question of how colonial themes were perceived and understood by visitors to these events remains largely unanswered in this literature. Through an examination of the Colonization Exposition [Takushoku hakurankai] that was held in Tokyo in 1912, this essay reflects on the question of audience reception, or how media texts both influence and are interpreted by their consumers. Using a previously unexamined contemporary magazine article that describes visitor reactions, it argues that the messages that the organizers of this exposition intended to send were interpreted in diverse ways by the viewing public, ranging from acceptance to rejection. The discussion centers on notions of dignified public education, human exhibits and the methodological difficulties involved in determining media reception from historical documents.

  • 37. Hitchcock, Michael
    et al.
    T. King, VictorParnwell, Michael
    Heritage Tourism in Southeast Asia2010Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first book to examine heritage tourism across the Southeast Asian region and from different disciplinary perspectives. With material that is new and topical, it makes an important contribution to the fields of tourism studies, cultural studies, development and planning studies, and beyond.

    Set against a backdrop of the demands, motivations and impacts of heritage tourism, the volume focuses on disputes and conflicts over what heritage is, what it means, and how it has been presented, re-presented, developed and protected. It examines the different actors involved in encounters and contestation, drawing in issues of identity construction and negotiation, and requiring the contextualization of heritage in national and global processes of identity formation and transformation. Among the questions touched upon are the ownership of heritage, its appropriate use, access to it versus conservation needs, heritage as a commodity, as entertainment and as an educational medium, and the interpretation and representation of heritage forms.

    The volume is more than a tourism study and of interest beyond the immediate field of tourism studies, however. It also provides ample data about the various governmental institutions and international agencies, and about how their decisions are made. Moreover, with conclusions based on credible methodologies and data, this is a key resource for both academic researchers and governmental agencies.

  • 38. Hoffstaedter, Gerhard
    Modern Muslim Identities: Negotiating Religion and Ethnicity in Malaysia2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores a central tension in identity politics – how the state, civil society and people in general may want to create and maintain cultural, religious and social cohesion but paradoxically their practices in everyday life often run counter to this. Malaysia is no exception. Here, a political elite maintains a hegemonic system of control and cultural dominance but must juggle political pressure from Islamic and Malay supremacists on the one hand and moderate civil society groups on the other. The result is a complex interplay of domination, accommodation and negotiation between the state and its citizens.

    At the heart of the study is the conjuncture between Malay ethnicity and Islamic faith, hence an examination of the state discourse on ‘civilizational Islam’, but other areas are also examined, including the arts as a contested space where artists and the state vie to shape the nation’s imagination.

    At the theoretical level, this book is part of a greater narrative about identity politics. It seeks to reach broader understanding of what Heidegger calls being-in-the-world, or the way we relate to other people and places around us. Thus, this book brings a variety of philosophical theory, anthropological insights and social theory together to present an interesting, in-depth ethnographic exploration of contemporary Malay Muslim identity politics.

  • 39. Ivarsson, Søren
    Creating Laos: The Making of a Lao Space between Indochina and Siam, 1860-19452011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The existence of Laos today is taken for granted. But the crystallization of a Lao national idea and ultimate independence for the country was a long and uncertain process.

    This book examines the process through which Laos came into existence under French colonial rule through to the end of World War II. Rather than assuming that the Laos we see today was an historical given, the book looks at how Laos’s position at the intersection of two conflicting spatial layouts of ‘Thailand’ and ‘Indochina’ made its national form a particularly contested process.

    This, however, is not an analysis of nation-building from the perspec-tive of administrative and political structures. Rather, the book charts the emergence of a notion of a specifically Lao cultural identity that served to buttress Laos as a separate ‘Lao space’, both in relation to Siam/Thailand and within French Indochina.

  • 40. Jackson, Gerald
    et al.
    Lenstrup, Marie
    Getting Published: A Companion for the Humanities and Social Sciences2011Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    An imperative element of the academic process is publishing research findings. Yet this is becoming increasingly difficult for authors to achieve as publishers are presented with growing numbers of manuscripts, decreasing library sales, and stronger demands on profitability.

    This book aims to maximise would-be authors’ chances of success in the race to get published. The key concerns are to increase authors’ knowledge and understanding of how the academic publishing industry works; to show authors how they can integrate this understanding into every stage of their work on a publication project; and through this to give them control over the fate of their work. The book also discusses the current state and challenges of academic publishing and indicates where new technology is taking the industry.

  • 41. Jacobsen, Trudy
    Lost Goddesses: The Denial of Female Power in Cambodian History2008Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women had a high status in pre-modern Southeast Asia; this is constantly stated, especially in relation to discussions on the status of women today in the region. Why, then, is it that the position of women there today is far from equitable? Few studies have examined how or when - let alone why - this change came about.

    This is the first study ever to address the place of women in Cambodian history. A narrative and visual tour de force, it revises accepted perspectives in the history and geopolitical organization of Cambodia since c. 230 C.E. In so doing, the book examines the relationship between women and power and analyses the extent of female political and economic participation as revealed in historical sources, including the ways in which women were represented in art and literature.

    By taking an analytical approach through the sequence of chronological periods, it is possible to determine when and why the status of women changed and what factors contributed to these changes. Significantly, although Cambodian women have been represented at different times as ’powerless’ in western analyses, they have continued to exercise authority outside those areas of concern to western constructs of power.

  • 42. Kampen, Thomas
    Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and the Evolution of the Chinese Communist Leadership1999Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Analyses the power struggles within the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party between 1931, when several Party leaders left Shanghai and entered the Jiangxi Soviet, and 1945, by which time Mao Zedong, Liu Shaoqi and Zhou Enlai had emerged as senior CCP leaders. In 1949 they established the People's Republic of China and ruled it for several decades.

    Based on new Chinese sources, this study challenges long-established views that Mao Zedong became CCP leader during the Long March (1934-35) and that by 1935 the CCP was independent of the Comintern in Moscow. The result is a critique not only of official Chinese historiography but also of Western (especially US) scholarship that all future histories of the rise of the CCP and power struggles within the PRC will need to take into account.

  • 43. Kaur, Ravinder
    Introduction2015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 2, p. 3-3Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Kent, Alexandra
    Divinity and Diversity: A Hindu Revitalization Movement in Malaysia2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A timely and relevant study in this age of concern about trans-national ’religious’ networks where powerful use of ethnographic date illuminates an original and striking thesis on the ambiguous nature of the Sai Baba movement. What makes this work outstanding is how the author places her material against the complex ethnic, political and religious situation of Malaysia. The book looks closely at the Malaysian following of the contemporary Indian godman Sathya Sai Baba, a neo-Hindu guru famed for his miracle-working.

    The ’911’ attacks on the United States and subsequent ’war on terrorism’ have brought a discussion of transnational ’religious’ networks onto centre stage. While the Sai Baba movement has no militaristic ideology, it may - like any other such movement - ultimately call into question the sovereignty of the nation state.

    Today, then, issues of faith and devotion are more urgent than ever in the interfaces between diverse world-views, not only at local and national levels but, increasingly, at the global level as well.

  • 45. Kim, Uichol
    Individualism and Collectivism: A Psychological, Cultural and Ecological Analysis1995Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fascinating and cogent exposition of the individualism-collectivism debate.

  • 46. Kirketerp, Anne
    et al.
    Bak, Margrete
    Buus, Marianne
    Entreprenørskab og foretagsomhed i de kunstneriske uddannelser i Norden2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [da]

    Denne rapport, udført af Kirketerp, Buus og Bak for KreaNord i 2011, ønsker at bidrage til, at studerende på de kunstneriske uddannelser i Norden styrkes i deres forudsætninger for at kunne omsætte deres kreative og kunstneriske kompetencer til et bæredygtigt arbejdsliv. Rapporten er rettet mod besluttende myndigheder, uddannelsesansvarlige og undervisere og kan styrke både interesse og viden, samt motivere handling. Rapporten giver definitioner indenfor entreprenørskab, metoder, cases, samt en model, som beskriver handlingsmål og tilrettelæggelse i entreprenørskabsundervisning.

    Genudgivet i 2015 i forbindelse med afviklingen af KreaNord, Nordisk Ministerråds initiativ om kulturelle og kreative erhverv (2008–2015).

  • 47. Knudsen, Are
    Violence and Belonging: Land, Love and Lethal Conflict in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honour and violence is a major theme in the anthropology of the Middle East, yet – apart from political violence – most studies approach violence from the perspective of honour.

    By contrast, this important study examines the meanings of lethal conflict in a little-studied tribal society in Pakistan’s unruly North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) and offers a new perspective on its causes. Based on an in-depth study of local conflicts, the book challenges stereotyped images of a region and people miscast as extremist and militant. Being grounded in local ethnography enables the book to shed light on the complexities of violence, not only at the structural or systemic level, but also as experienced by the men involved in lethal conflict. In this way, the book provides a subjective and experiential approach to violence that is applicable beyond the field locality and relevant for advancing the study of violence in the Middle East and South Asia.

  • 48. Krul, Kees
    Preserving Bang Krachao’s Green Space through Agriculture2015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 2, p. 25-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban sprawl brings about considerable changes in the peripheral areas of the city. Rich in many vegetation types, mangrove forests, and agricultural plots, Bang Krachao is one of the largest remaining green areas in the proximity of Bangkok. This area is currently under threat as Bangkok’s urban sprawl has not gone without effect in Bang Krachao: green areas are diminishing due to an increased developmental interest in the area together with a growing number of residents. This essay examines the role of the agricultural sector in persevering the remaining green spaces by employing a SWOT-analysis. Findings show that despite a number of weaknesses and threats, there are several important opportunities the sector can capitalize on. Corresponding initiatives are suggested that help to preserve the remaining green spaces and at the same time enhance Bang Krachao’s agriculture sector. Without new initiatives to reverse urban sprawl, it is likely that the ‘green lung of Bangkok’ will be filled with more concrete and asphalt.

  • 49. Kværne, Per
    et al.
    Thargyal, Rinzin
    Bon, Buddhism and Democracy: The Building of a Tibetan National Identity1993Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas the old independent Tibet was based on a Buddhist theocratic order, what is increasingly seen today is a growing national awareness. This perhaps explains moves are being made to create a plural society embracing the faiths and ethnic and social

  • 50. Lidin, Olof G.
    Tanegashima: The Arrival of Europe in Japan2002Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The year 1543 marked the beginning of a new global consciousness in Japan with the arrival of shipwrecked Portuguese merchants on Tanegashima Island in southern Japan. Other Portuguese rapidly followed and Japan became aware of a world beyond India. The Portuguese brought with them the musket, which was quickly copied and began to change Japanese warfare and influence their unification process. After the merchants had opened the way, the first missionary, Francis Xavier, arrived in 1549 and the Christian century began.

    This is not a new story but it is the first time that Japanese, Portuguese and other European accounts have been brought together and presented in English. The arrival of the Portuguese was recorded by the Japanese in the Tanegashima Kafu, the Teppoki and the Kunitomo teppoki which are here translated and presented together with European reports. Special attention is given to the role of Tanegashima Island and of Mendes Pinto, author of a famous picaresque account of Japan. An index lists pertinent words and names in roman and Chinese or Japanese script.

    This story of Japan’s first encounter with the West – augmented with maps and a beautiful blending of Portuguese and Japanese illustrations – will be of interest to a wide audience.

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