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  • 1. Badhwar, Ingvild
    The Elephant-shaped Hole in the Universe:: A literary analysis of Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things2016In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 3, p. 4-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this essay, I read Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things as a melodrama in order to explore the relationship between the subaltern and the world of everyday life. I draw upon Spivak’s conception of the subaltern, her lack of voice and location within both everyday life and the narrative of history. I argue that the main character, Ammu—not speaking the language of everyday life, yet desperately desiring to express herself—is forced to resort to melodramatics, bolstering her incomprehensibility and leaving her even more isolated. I discuss the relationship between post-colonial studies, melodrama, everyday language, skepticism, innocence and knowledge, representations, and the subaltern’s opportunity to regain her voice in order to tell her own story.

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