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  • 1. Boshier, Carol-Anne
    Mapping Cultural Nationalism: The Scholars of the Burma Society, 1910-19352018 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the proscription of public political debates under colonial rule in Burma, boundary-crossing ventures like the Burma Research Society (founded in 1910) allowed those from different racial and cultural backgrounds to engage in debates about national belonging and identity. At the same time their scholarship generated new historical and cultural knowledge. Such social and intellectual interactions sowed the seeds of nascent nationalism in Burma, not least a unifying Burmano-Buddhist hegemony as promoted by BRS members like J.S. Furnivall and his circle. This was contested by the regional nationalism of San Shwe Bu, with Leslie Fernandes Taylor also warning of the consequences of neglecting the ethnic and linguistic diversity of Burma’s many races. With the rise of Rangoon University and popular culture and militant nationalism coming to dominate the social and political landscape by the mid-1930s, the influence of the BRS began to wane. This detailed study of the BRS and its membership, together with an analysis of its published output, contextualizes the Society within its metropolitan and regional setting, as well as drawing on a broader, transnational intellectual landscape. This timely work on the Society’s intellectual legacy has the potential to inform current debates in Myanmar at a time when the activities of ultra-nationalist groups threaten other religions and ethnicities’ rights as citizens.

  • 2. Charney, Michael
    et al.
    Wellen, Kathryn
    Warring Societies of Pre-Colonial Southeast Asia: Local Cultures of Conflict Within a Regional Context2018 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why is it that warfare in Southeast Asian history is depicted so differently in various historical sources and representations? Why have scholars looking at different countries found so many exceptions to regional overviews of warfare? The present volume seeks to present a new approach to the study of warfare in the region by abandoning the generalizations made in the conventional literature. The contributors offer a range of new studies of warfare in local areas within the region, looking at warfare on its own, local terms rather than for what it says about warfare in the region as a whole.   This approach for the first time submits Southeast Asia to comparative analysis in a way that avoids artificial and misleading regional attributes. The varied case studies, researched and written by a number of experts of local warfare within the region include naval warfare eighteenth century Vietnam, civil war in South Sulawesi during the Pénéki War, the art and texts of war in Burmese warfare, modes of warfare in precolonial Bali, war captive taking in Thailand, and kinship, religion, and war in late eighteenth century Maguindanao, and preparations for war in the Pacific rimlands. The volume makes an important contribution to the new literature emerging on the culture of indigenous warfare in North and South America, Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands, by offering a new and robust Southeast Asian entry on the one hand while adding to a new approach to the growing literature on early modern Southeast Asia warfare.

  • 3. Hellman, Jörgen
    Performing the Nation: Cultural Politics in New Order Indonesia2003Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In sharp contrast to today’s disorder was the apparent cohesion and stability of Indonesia during much of the New Order period (1965–98). While Suharto’s authoritarian rule was significant, the regime’s cultural policies also played their part. Ethnic, religious and regional sentiments were to be channelled into the field of art rather than being expressed in terms of class, religion or separatism. At the same time, culture was used to help develop a national Indonesian identity.

    This theme is explored by this study, which focuses on the efforts of a group of young art students based at the Bandung Academy of Performing Arts to revitalize traditional Longser theatre. The interaction between the artists and regime and their often-differing ideas about identity, the role of art and cultural traditions in Indonesia offers valuable insights into the underlying dynamics of the country’s current condition.

  • 4. Olivová, Lucie
    et al.
    Børdahl, Vibeke
    Lifestyle and Entertainment in Yangzhou2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yangzhou, once the central place of literati and urban culture, is still one of the most important centres of traditional culture in China today. Over the years particular regional forms of art and entertainment have arisen here, some surviving into the present time.

    This beautifully illustrated volume celebrates Yangzhou’s rich cultural tradition through a well-balanced spectrum of topics spanning the period from the late 17th century to modern times. These are grouped into four thematic parts: Yangzhou’s cultural heritage during historic downfalls and revivals; regional literature and book production; local theatre and storytelling; and various artists of the 18th-century Yangzhou School of Painting. Within each thematic part, descriptions and evaluations of cultural phenomena are supplemented with reflections on lifestyle and customs, weaving a virtual dialogue that binds the topical diversity of the collection tightly together.

  • 5. Sakhong, Lian H.
    In Search of Chin Identity: A Study in Religion, Politics and Ethnic Identity in Burma2003Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior to British annexation in 1896, Chinram was an independent country ruled by traditional tribal and local chiefs. Annexation saw the land divided between India and Burma and Chin society abruptly transformed, not least by the arrival of Christian missionaries. The conversion of the Chin to Christianity from traditional locally based Chin religion had unintended consequences as the Chin became involved in Burmese independence movements. They began to articulate their own Christian traditions of democracy and assert a burgeoning self-awareness of their own national identity. Moreover, the church has taken a key role in the struggle of Chin liberation movements in Burma and India. Just how Christianity has provided the Chin people with a means of preserving their national identity in the midst of multi-ethnic and multi-religious environments is the main focus of this study.

    Written by an exiled former Secretary General of the Chin National League for Democracy, this study contains valuable data on the Chin and their role in the history of Burma, and provides a clear analysis of the close relationship between religion, ethnicity and nationalism.

  • 6.
    Stopniece, Santa
    University of Jyväskylä.
    “Opportunities, but Nothing Very Concrete”: The Challenge Finns Face with Chinese Delegations’ General Level of Interest in Finland2015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the challenge of finding common ground between the Finns and the Chinese in the context of co-operation, trade and inward investment facilitation related to general lack of specific interest displayed by the Chinese. The article is ethnographic in nature and is mainly based on data obtained from interviewing individuals working for local governments in Finland and one of the state agencies responsible for attracting foreign investment. The study uses Speech Codes Theory (Philipsen, 1997) when analyzing the cultural aspects of expectations regarding communication between Chinese and Finns. According to interviewees, lack of serious interest, vague government guidelines, the longer time needed to build relationship, and involvement of intermediaries all contribute to the difficulty to move the discussions to a more specific level of focus. Finnish expectations regarding this type of communication are that it should be direct and task-oriented, because they feel pressure to yield real results quickly and efficiently. Suggested strategies to make the co-operation talks more specific are presenting the expertise areas of Finland, clarification regarding too general terms used by the Chinese, and investing into building personal relationships with them.

  • 7. Tayanin, Damrong
    et al.
    Lindell, Kristina
    Évrard, Olivier
    Fiskesjö, Magnus
    Hunting and Fishing in a Kammu Village: Revisiting a Classic Study in Southeast Asian Ethnography2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This detailed and fascinating description of traditional hunting, trapping and fishing in northern Laos includes illustrations of traps, weapons, etc., an insight into rites and taboos pertaining to the work, and much more. First published in 1991 and quickly out of print, the book was hailed as ‘an outstanding contribution to Southeast Asian ethnography … [It] is highly recommended not only for specialists in traditional hunting and fishing but also for those readers who wish to gain some insight “from the native’s point of view” into a fascinating tribal minority culture of highland Southeast Asia’ (Roland Mischung, Asian Folklore Studies). The book’s vivid descriptions and illustrations were especially praised.  Over the years, the two authors wrote several books together, often with other partners. In this instance, the major contribution is by Damrong Tayanin, drawing on his earlier life as a Kammu farmer and hunter.

    This reproduction of Hunting and Fishing is augmented by new material on food cultivation and its preparation among the Kammu by Kàm Ràw (Damrong Tayanin) together with essays by Håkan Lundström, Olivier Évrard and Magnus Fiskesjö.

  • 8. Voetmann, Per
    et al.
    Goldin, Angela
    Mäenpää, Marjo
    McAtackney, Laura
    Rekola, Sanna
    Lind, Ulrika
    Culture and sustainability2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 8 of 8
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