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  • 1.
    Amdam, Synnøve
    Faculty of Arts and Physical Education, Volda University College.
    Media Education Goes Professional?: Media Teachers’ Self-Image, Positioning and Educational Focus2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 81-95Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThis article explores how media teachers’ self-images, positionings and interpretative rep-ertoires inform educational practices in media education. Media education is viewed as a critical element of 21st century learning. However, we have very little knowledge of the im-plementers of this critical element, the media teachers. Based on a thematic literature review of historical positions of the Nordic media teacher, and supported by national survey data on the media teachers’ backgrounds, motivations and practices (n=383), the subject is explored through focus groups and individual interviews with media teachers at two case schools in upper secondary media education in Norway. The findings suggest that there are different and conflicting understandings about being media teachers, resulting in different educational practices with wider implications for the future implementation of media education. Keywords: media teachers, media education, media literacy, interpretative repertoires, pro-fessional cultures, communities of practice

  • 2.
    Axelson, Tomas
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Vernacular Meaning Making: Examples of Narrative Impact in Fiction FilmQuestioning the ‘Banal’ Notion in Mediatizationof Religion Theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primarymeans by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples ofnarrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators’lives, identities, and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realismof the narrative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with theirextra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The ‘banal’ notion of themediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context ofindividualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, itis problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators’ use of fictional narratives,especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay betweenspectators’ fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to findmoral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead, vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 3. Axelson, Tomas
    Vernacular Meaning Making: Examples of Narrative Impact in Fiction FilmQuestioning the ‘Banal’ Notion in Mediatizationof Religion Theory2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 143-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The outcome of an audience study supports theories stating that stories are a primarymeans by which we make sense of our experiences over time. Empirical examples ofnarrative impact are presented in which specific fiction film scenes condense spectators’lives, identities, and beliefs. One conclusion is that spectators test the emotional realismof the narrative for greater significance, connecting diegetic fiction experiences with theirextra-diegetic world in their quest for meaning, self and identity. The ‘banal’ notion of themediatization of religion theory is questioned as unsatisfactory in the theoretical context ofindividualized meaning-making processes. As a semantically negatively charged concept, itis problematic when analyzing empirical examples of spectators’ use of fictional narratives,especially when trying to characterize the idiosyncratic and complex interplay betweenspectators’ fiction emotions and their testing of mediated narratives in an exercise to findmoral significance in extra-filmic life. Instead, vernacular meaning-making is proposed.

  • 4.
    Bastiansen, Henrik G
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Rethinking Mass Communications in Norway: The Neglected Power of the Centre-Left Alliance in the Early 20th Century and its Importance until the Present2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the importance of the early years of mass communications in order to understand the shaping of them – the power of creating mass media for whole nations. It begins with references to scholars studying large nations and asks whether their results can be generalized to smaller countries. Therefore, it uses Norway as a case study. To what degree were Norway’s four major mass media – press, film, radio and television – formed institutionally in their early years? And if they were formed in this way, how long did the consequences of such a formation last? These questions have been neglected topics in research, so in order to answer them we also need to rethink the connections between the different media.

  • 5. Bastiansen, Henrik G
    Rethinking Mass Communications in Norway: The Neglected Power of the Centre-Left Alliance in the Early 20th Century and its Importance until the Present2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses the importance of the early years of mass communications in order to understand the shaping of them – the power of creating mass media for whole nations. It begins with references to scholars studying large nations and asks whether their results can be generalized to smaller countries. Therefore, it uses Norway as a case study. To what degree were Norway’s four major mass media – press, film, radio and television – formed institutionally in their early years? And if they were formed in this way, how long did the consequences of such a formation last? These questions have been neglected topics in research, so in order to answer them we also need to rethink the connections between the different media.

  • 6.
    Bengtsson, Mette
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Approaches to Political Commentary in Scandinavia: A Call for Textual, Evaluating Scholarship2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 5-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political commentary is a contested genre that has attracted a great deal of attention in the Scandinavian public debate, whereas the scholarly literature on it is still in an initial phase. In order to strengthen future research, the present paper suggests a two-dimensional matrix indexing the research on Scandinavian political commentary along the dimensions text/context and descriptive/evaluative. The matrix enables us to see more clearly what we already know and where we lack knowledge. It enables us to see how each category can be developed, the interplay among them, and the obvious lack of textual, evaluative ap-proaches. The author argues that a joint, cross-disciplinary engagement is necessary if we are to adequately understand the potentials and problems of political commentary.K

  • 7.
    Bergström, Annika
    Journalism Media and Communication (JMG) University of Gothenburg.
    Digital Equality and the Uptake of DigitalApplications among Seniors of Different Age2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 79-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ageing societies are facing challenges from the perspective of the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs). There is an increase in online services relevant for the economic, political, cultural and private life. Those who participate more fully in a digi-tally mediated social life enjoy advantages over their digitally disadvantaged counterparts. Today’s digital divide is not first and foremost between pensioners and others, but between younger and older pensioners. Scholars identify the need for longitudinal research among younger and older seniors to understand the differences between more or less advantaged users. Based on longitudinal, representative surveys, the present study finds that there is a clear gap between younger and older seniors, and that it is closing only very slowly. Age and level of education are powerful explanatory factors whereas generational belonging and social capital contribute only to a limited extent to the understanding of Internet uptake among older adults.

  • 8. Bjerke, Paul
    et al.
    Kjos Fonn, Birgitte
    A Hidden Theoryin Financial Crisis Journalism?: The Case of Norway2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 113-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses press coverage of the dramatic finance crisis and the ensuingEuropean debt crisis in Europe, in three decisive periods. The authors conduct quantitativeand qualitative content analyses of two major mainstream Norwegian newspapers, Aftenpostenand Dagbladet, employing concepts and methods from framing theory, to analysecoverage in the framework of two contesting schools in economics.The study finds traces of discussions of finance brokers’ ethics and some discussions ofgovernmental regulations that made the 2008 crisis possible, but few indications of a basicdiscussion of the system as such. The authors conclude that the crisis was framed more asa superficial, short-term problem (as per a mainstream, neoliberal theory of economics)than as a deeper and long-term system problem (as a more critical ‘political economics’theory would have held).

  • 9.
    Bock Segaard, Signe
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Perceptions of Social Media: A Joint Arena for Voters and Politicians?2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 65-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While observers have focused on the political use of social media when exploring theirdemocratic potential, we know little about users’ perceptions of these media. These perceptionscould well be important to understanding the political use of social media. Inexploring users’ perceptions, the article asks whether politicians and voters view socialmedia in a similar way, and to what extent they consider social media to be an apt arenafor political communication. Within a Norwegian context, which may prove useful as acritical case, and using the technological frames model, we find that although voters’ andpoliticians’ opinions are not that dissimilar overall, politicians are more likely to recognizethe political communicative role of social media. However, social media do indeed havethe potential to become arenas for political mobilization among groups that traditionallyare less visible in political arenas.

  • 10.
    Christensen, Christa Lykke
    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication, University of Copenhagen.
    Healthy Ageing and Mediated Health Expertise2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no special issue 1, p. 9-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The media are, for many older people, one of the most important sources of information about health. In this article, I examine older people’s experiences and use of media to acquire knowledge about health issues relating to their own life. Key questions concern how media influence older people’s perceptions of health and to what extent they trust the media in relation to health issues. The study demonstrates that the media do not have a uniform influence among older people. For some, the media function as a guide to main-taining and experimenting with an active lifestyle in late life; for others, the media are met with a skeptical attitude as they are not trusted as a source of reliable and unequivocal information on health issues. The study is based on a qualitative interview study with men and women between 65 and 86 years.

  • 11. Enghel, Florencia
    Towards a Political Economy of Communication in Development?2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 11-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the development communication equation, whether more theoretical, empirical and analytical attention is given to ‘development’ or to ‘communication’ makes a difference: where the emphasis is on development, it is at the expense of communication. Since com-munication and media arguably play an increasingly pervasive role in the everyday life of citizens and in the politics, economies and governance of most societies, the characteristics and role of specific forms of applied communication strategies in the context of the neolib-eral project merit critical scrutiny. Given a complex global scenario, what can a political economy approach bring into an agenda for the future of development communication as a field of study, a practice and an institutional project? This article outlines ways in which a focus on political economy dimensions may contribute to understanding the obstacles and limits to a transformative practice of international development communication.

  • 12.
    Falkheimer, Jesper
    et al.
    The Department of Strategic Communication, Lund University.
    Blach-Ørsten, Mark
    Department of Communication and Arts Communication, Journalism and Social Change, Roskilde University.
    Kæmsgaard Eberholst, Mads
    Department of Communication and Arts Communication, Journalism and Social Change, Roskilde University.
    Möllerström, Veselinka
    The Department of Strategic Communication, Lund University.
    News Media and the Öresund Region.: A Case of Horizontal Europeanisation?2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 1-15Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a first attempt to investigate the news content and news routines of Danish and Swedish news media covering the Öresund region. From a theoretical per-spective, the Öresund region can be considered a possible best-case example of what is categorised as horizontal Europeanisation, in other words, of the potential for increased communication linkages in news media content among European Union (EU) member states. We investigate this topic by analysing news content published by selected media outlets from 2002 to 2012 and by interviewing Danish and Swedish journalists who cover the region. We find that most news content does not mention the Öresund region, and that one reason for this lack might be that neither Danish nor Swedish reporters consider the region to be newsworthy.

  • 13. Falkheimer, Jesper
    et al.
    Heide, Mats
    From Public Relations to Strategic Communication in Sweden: The Emergence of a Transboundary Field of Knowledge2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 123-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this conceptual article, we argue that strategic communication is a transboundary concept that captures, better than public relations does, the complex phenomenon of an organiza-tion’s targeted communication processes in contemporary society. The aim of the article is twofold. First, the purpose is to describe and reflect the development and institutionalization of public relations education and research in Sweden. Second, based on the transboundary changes we see in industry, education and research, we argue that strategic communication is a conceptual and holistic framework that is more valid and relevant than public relations. Moreover, we suggest that strategic communication also integrates organizational (internal) communication as well as aspects of management theory and marketing, thus allowing us to understand, explain and criticize contemporary communication processes both inside organizations and between organizations and the surrounding society. The article is mainly based on secondary data about the public relations industry, earlier research and a mapping of public relations education and research in Sweden.

  • 14.
    Fernández-Ardèvol, Mireia
    et al.
    Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    Sawchuk, Kim
    Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University, Montreal.
    Grenier, Line
    Department of Communication Studies, Concordia University, Montreal.
    Maintaining Connections: Octo- and Nonagenarians on Digital ‘Use and Non-use’2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The concepts of user and non-user are frequently deployed within media and communica-tions literature. What do these terms mean if examined regarding age and ageing? In this article we explore and trouble these notions through an analysis of twenty-two conversa-tions with a group of octogenarians and nonagenarians living in a retirement home. Their descriptions of their changing uses of media througout lifetime, and their encounters with mobile phones, computers, newspapers, television, radio and landline phones, are presented as a set of ‘techno-biographies’ that challenge binary divisions of use and non-use, linear notions of media adoption, and add texture to the idea of ‘the fourth age’ as a time of life bereft of decisional power. Speaking with octogenarians and nonagenarians provides in-sights into media desires, needs and uses, and opens up ‘non-use’ as a complex, variegated activity, rather than a state of complete inaction or disinterest.

  • 15.
    Florencia, Cristine
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    The Mediatized Zlatan,Made by Sweden: An Immigrant’s Path from Provincial Othernessto a Western Literary Space2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 3-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses the mediatization of the brand and celebrity Zlatan Ibrahimovićusing the reception and marketing of the footballer’s life story and autobiography as itsmain case. It is shown that the construction of a myth such as Ibrahimović transcends themateriality of the book as well as geographical, vernacular and media boundaries, as it isconstituted as content in a digital network that produces signification. This ‘Zlatan content’is framed by national Swedish values and a traditional Western myth of individual masculineexcellence. It is also marked by emotions, class and race, telling a tale about the marginalizedemotive immigrant becoming both a national icon and part of an imaginary Westernghetto experience and global literary canon formation. It is argued that the performance ofexcitable speech acts is crucial in the mediatization and branding of mass market literatureand celebrities such as Ibrahimović.

  • 16.
    Givskov, Cecilie
    Department of Media, Cognition and Communication,University of Copenhagen .
    Growing Old with Mediatization: Reflexivity and Sense of Agency2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 53-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Computers, tablets, smartphones and mobile phones enable people to act across contexts. For individuals born during the first half of the twentieth century, these social infrastruc-tures for agency arrived late in the life course. This article presents an analysis of a set of interviews that were thematically coded to reveal ways in which the infrastructures figured in reflexive practices among older single-dwelling women. The interviews were patterned by the shared image of a ‘media world’ and the hypothesis of the indispensability of newer media for living a socially integrated life in today’s society. Control of media connected with feelings of dis- or empowerment; ultimately media amplified the participants’ feelings of being autonomous actors. I argue that the newer media infrastructures extend the scope and need for reflexivity and augment the reflexive ageing associated with the continued activity and autonomy of the third age.

  • 17. Gunder Strøm Krogager, Stinne
    et al.
    Klitgaard Povlsen, Karen
    Degn, Hans-Peter
    Patterns of Media Use and Reflectionson Media among young Danes2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 97-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article examines cross-media use among 10- to 16-year-old Danish children andadolescents. Our research interest is in identifying and affirming patterns among media use,gender and age. Using a methodological design that combines qualitative and quantitativemethods, we interviewed participants regarding their media use and paired our qualitativefindings with quantitative rating inquiries generated from Danish commercial databases.Our results suggest that although cross-media use is complex and differs according to ageand gender, media are often used for similar purposes, e.g., sustaining social relationships.

  • 18. Gynnild, Astrid
    The Visual Power of News Agencies2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 2, p. 25-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While staff photographers are losing their jobs, news agency networks have become main suppliers of visual content to the news media. A global news site such as the Guardian leans to news agencies for most of its selected visuals. In tandem with the expanding visual power of new agencies, the ethical standards of the wholesalers are challenged by increasing amounts of user generated content, distant editing, and the live-streaming of breaking news. This article discusses editorial dilemmas prompted by proliferate, high tech processing of visual content by the news agencies’ global networks, exemplified by the coverage of terrorism. The analysis is grounded in a variety of empirical data, and aspects of Manuel Castells’ theory on communication power provide a theorizing framework for the discussion. The study suggests that the visual power of today’s news agencies rests on three interconnected processes of handling imagery: agency infrastructuring, technological infrastructuring and global newsroom infrastructuring.

  • 19. Hetland, Per
    Popularizing the Internet: Traveling Companions Supporting the Good News2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 157-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In popular science and technology writing, “boosterism” is prominent. Writers overwhelminglydescribe science and technology in enthusiastic terms, thereby promoting the deficitor Public Appreciation of Science and Technology model (PAST). A crucial aspect ofthe PAST model is its pro-innovation bias: writers enroll chaperones in the texts, such asspokespersons, users, celebrities, witnesses, experts, and authorities, to support their claims.Both “boosterism” and pro-innovation bias constrain the public’s critical understanding ofscience and technology. This study includes a detailed exploration of pro-innovation bias inthe popularization of the Internet in the Norwegian press and how journalists use chaperonesto support their claims. The author demonstrates that, in popularizing the Internet, proinnovationbias manifests several other biases, such as individual-praise, pro-technology,individual-blame, technology-blame, and source biases

  • 20.
    Isotalus, Pekka
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Almonkari, Tanja
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Political Scandal Tests Trust in Politicians: The Case of the Finnish Minister Who Resigned Because of His Text Messages2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Political scandals have been observed to be increasingly common everywhere. In April 2008, the Finnish Minister for Foreign Affairs, Mr. Ilkka Kanerva, was compelled to resign because of the sensation arising from the enormous number of suggestive text messages that he had sent to a young female erotic dancer. During the scandal, the media followed this episode intensively. The present article considers what kinds of qualities for political leadership the media called for during this scandal and how these qualities were justified. The paper is based partly on quantitative but mostly on qualitative content analyses of the four most read newspapers in Finland. The results show five categories, the qualities being professional competence, personal characteristics and behaviour, trustworthiness, maintenance of relations and communication skills. The results show that the require-ments imposed by the media are high, but that evaluation of professional competence is still crucial. Further, the occurrence of a scandal seems to trigger discussions on trust in politicians.

  • 21.
    Jansson, André
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Polymedia Distinctions: The Sociocultural Stratification of Interpersonal MediaPractices in Couple Relationships2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 33-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Polymedia”, a concept introduced by Madianou and Miller (2012), refers to the everydayconditions of abundant media resources. Whereas such conditions imply that the classificatoryprocesses concerning media as cultural properties become increasingly complex, fewstudies have tried to produce a general picture of how interpersonal media practices arepart of sociocultural reproduction. This study is based on a nationwide survey conductedin Sweden in 2012 and focuses on mediated communication among “polymedia couples”(39 percent of all Swedish couples). The article demonstrates that sociocultural factors areimportant for explaining media uses, also when media accessibility is more or less unlimited,and pinpoints how preferences for certain modalities of communication are linked toother lifestyle practices as markers of taste. Most notably, email communication attains ahigher sociocultural status than online chat functions and social media, testifying to theenduring significance of asynchronous, text-based communication in a longer format as aculturally distinctive mode of intimate communication.

  • 22.
    Johannessen, Jill
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Worldview Struggles under a New Climate Regime: South African and Norwegian Media Coverage of COP172015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 35-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The UN summit on climate change in Durban constituted an important moment in the con - tinuous discourse on how to understand climate change and the framing of the problems and solutions. A new emergent frame of understanding could be detected in the press, which the author calls the ‘out-dated worldview’ frame. This frame contains a critique of the clear-cut division between developing vs. developed countries from the 1992 Rio Convention, and may influence how we understand burden-sharing roles in a new global climate deal. In an eager attempt to include all major polluters within a new climate regime, there is a danger that the principle of ‘common but differentiated responsibility’ will be ignored, which may be an attempt to excuse the rich industrialized countries from their responsibility after 150 years of benefitting from fossil-fuel-driven development.

  • 23. Kantola, Anu
    Mediatization of Power: Corporate CEOs in Flexible Capitalism2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 29-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article analyses the mediatization of corporate power with a special focus on the work of the CEO. A review of the literature on the role of the media in corporate manage-ment, especially in the work of corporate leaders, shows how the techniques of power in corporate management have become mediatized. Different media have become increasingly important for the work of corporate leaders. More importantly, media have become tools of power. In flexible and soft capitalism, corporate power is exercised using performative and affective techniques aimed at identity and community formation. Consequently, dif-ferent media are utilized as tools of corporate management and control. With regard to the mediatization of power, the case of corporate management suggests that one should look into the societal and institutional structures of power rather than into the power of the media

  • 24.
    Keinonen, Heidi
    et al.
    Turku Institute for Advanced Studies, University of Turku.
    Klein Shagrir, Oranit
    College and Open University of Israel.
    From Public Service Broadcasting to Soci(et)al TV: Producers’ Perceptions of Interactivity and Audience Participation in Finland and Israel2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 65-79Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractIn a changing media environment, television is being transformed by the adoption of prac-tices such as audience participation and interactivity. This article analyses the ways in which managers and producers in Finnish and Israeli public service and hybrid television companies perceive participation and interactivity. We suggest that while these concepts can be de-scribed by hybrid broadcasters using the technologically- and commercially-oriented concept of ‘social TV’, the term does not adequately address the perceptions of socially-oriented public service broadcasters (PSBs). Hence, we propose the society- and value-oriented concept of ‘soci(et)al TV’ in an effort to conceptualise the PSBs’ perceptions concerning the adoption of interactivity and participation practices while they seek to fulfil their social commitments and objectives. Our argument is based on a comparative study of two different broadcasting models (public service vs. hybrid) in two national media systems and cultures.

  • 25.
    Kenyon, Andrew T
    et al.
    Melbourne Law School, University of Melbourne.
    Svensson, Eva-Maria
    Department of Law, University of Gothenburg.
    Edström, Maria
    Department of Journalism, Media and Communica- tion, University of Gothenburg.
    Building and Sustaining Freedom of Expression: Considering Sweden2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 31-45Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although countries protect and promote freedom of expression in different ways, free speech can be understood to have two basic aspects in democratic constitutional systems: non-censorship and diversity of voices. This article examines how the approach to free speech in Sweden contains both these aspects. Selected comparisons with the US First Amendment, and German broadcasting law, indicate the value in the Swedish approach but also reveal challenges that it faces if free speech’s dual aspects are not clearly recognised – a danger that some contemporary statements suggests is real. Articulating free speech in terms of both non-censorship and diversity may aid Swedish parliamentary processes to uphold important structural aspects of the freedom, but it would also bring into focus larger questions about the limits of parliamentary processes alone in building a viable system of freedom of expression for the future.

  • 26. Larsen, Håkon
    The Legitimacy of Public Service Broadcasting in the 21st Century: The Case of Scandinavia2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper examines the debate on the future of public service broadcasting (PSB) in Norway and Sweden in the 2000s. I have analysed the discourses on PSB that dominate the public debate in the two countries, the cultural policy related to PSB, as well as the legitimizing rhetoric of the Norwegian public service broadcaster Norsk rikskringkasting (NRK) and that of the Swedish public service broadcaster Sveriges Television (SVT). Theoretically, the analysis draws on normative theories on the role of PSB in promoting democracy, culture and a well-functioning public sphere, as well as theories on democracy and the public sphere per se.

  • 27. Larson, Sofia
    Battling Mainstream Media, Commentators and Organized Debaters: Experiences from Citizens’ Online Opinion Writing in Sweden2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 77-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents the results of a qualitative interview study on citizen opinion writers who are active on a citizen media website in Sweden. The study explores the writers’ experi-ences of participating in the alternative and citizen media landscape online, their purposes, the benefits and finally what impedes their participation. The results paint a picture of a sole grass-roots writer who aims to reach the broad political sphere using a mix of strategies to participate, oppose the mainstream media or use the Web as a writing gym. The restrictive powers they encounter are associated with mainstream media, commentators and organized debaters. This is discussed as causing a narrower public debate, less participation and less counter-hegemonic content.

  • 28.
    Lennie, Jennie
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Tacchi, Jo
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Tensions, Challenges and Issues in Evaluating Communication for Development: Findings from Recent Research and Strategies for Sustainable Outcomes2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 25-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The complexity of development and social change and growing tensions between dominant results-based and emerging learning and improvement-based approaches to evaluating de-velopment interventions have created major challenges for the evaluation of communication for development (C4D). Drawing on our recent research, we identify significant tensions, challenges and issues in evaluating C4D. They include contextual and institutional chal-lenges, problems with attribution and unrealistic timeframes, a lack of capacities in both evaluation and C4D, and a lack of appreciation, funding and support for approaches that are more appropriate for the evaluation of C4D. We propose various strategies that can help to address these challenges and issues, including using a rigorous mixed methods approach, and implementing long-term, holistic evaluation capacity development at all levels and our new framework for evaluating C4D. These and other strategies can help to create a supportive environment in which new ideas and approaches can flourish, more sustainable outcomes of C4D can be achieved, and C4D organisations can become more sustainable and effective. The implications for C4D policy are considered

  • 29.
    Lenstra, Noah
    Noah Lenstra Home Research Publications Teaching Service Events People Noah Lenstra Assistant Professor Department of Library and Information Studies School of Education The University of North Carolina - Greensboro (UNCG).
    Maintaining Connections: Octo- and Nonagenarians on Digital ‘Use and Non-use’2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 39-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the United States of America, senior centers and public libraries are ubiquitous social institutions found in virtually every municipality. This article analyses these institutions as community-based information infrastructure in the digital learning practices of older adults. Older adults turn to these institutions to learn technology in retirement. How learning takes place in these spaces is shaped both by the institutions, and by the older adults. Negotiations between institutions and older adults shape digital learning. These negotiations are shaped by societal ageism. This article shows that older adults are not passive participants in tech-nology learning, using services provided for them by others, but instead actively shape both how learning services are proffered and the institutional contexts in which these services exist. By learning to embrace the agency of older adults, these under-funded public institu-tions could powerfully reconfigure themselves for an information society that is also ageing.

  • 30. Láb, Filip
    et al.
    Štefaniková, Sandra
    Photojournalism in Central Europe: Editorial and Working Practices2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 2, p. 7-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adoption of digital technologies, along with current economic realities, has affected the entire process of visual news production. It has also influenced the traditional concept of photojournalism. As a result, news photographers face multiple new challenges. Although visual news material is becoming ever more important, news organizations have cut back on employment, leaving those few who remain employed with additional workload and responsibilities. Based on interviews with photojournalists and photo editors, this article examines the current state of photojournalism and editorial processes in three Central European countries – the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia. Findings indicate that photojournalists and photo editors face ongoing developments in the photographic medium that significantly affect their working practices and routines. At the same time, they must deal with increasing workload, new responsibilities, competition and the challenges of maintaining quality in the digital age.

  • 31. Mäenpää, Jennie
    Rethinking Photojournalism: The Changing Work Practices and Professionalism of Photojournalists in the Digital Age2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public service, ethics, objectivity, autonomy and immediacy are still often considered the core values of professional journalism. However, photojournalistic work has confronted historic changes since the advent of digitalization in the late 1980s. Professional photo-journalists have been caught manipulating news images, video production has become a major part of news photographers’ work, and newspapers freely publish photographs and videos taken by the general public. The present article examines how news photographers negotiate these changes in photo-journalistic work practices, and how they define their professional ambitions in the digital age. Photojournalists’ articulations of professionalism are approached in relation to three digital innovations in photojournalism: digital photo editing, video production and user-generated images in newspapers. The empirical data consist of an online survey of and interviews with photojournalists in Finland. In the final analysis, it is suggested that the core ideals of photo-journalism have to be renegotiated, because the work environment has changed drastically.

  • 32.
    Mörner, Cecilia
    et al.
    School of Humanities, Education and Social Sciences, Örebro University.
    Olausson, Ulrika
    School of Education and Communication , Jönköping University.
    Hunting the Beast on YouTube: The Framing of Nature in Social Media2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 17-29Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    17Mörner, Cecilia & Olausson, Ulrika (2017). Hunting the Beast on YouTube. The Framing of Nature in Social Media. Nordicom Review 38(1): 17-29. doi:10.1515/nor-2016-0038Hunting the Beast on YouTube The Framing of Nature in Social MediaCecilia Mörner & Ulrika OlaussonAbstractHumans’ perceived relationship to nature and non-human lifeforms is fundamental for sustainable development; different framings of nature – as commodity, as threat, as sacred etc. – imply different responses to future challenges. The body of research on nature repre-sentations in various symbolic contexts is growing, but the ways in which nature is framed by people in the everyday has received scant attention. This paper aims to contribute to our understanding of the framing of nature by studying how wild-boar hunting is depicted on YouTube. The qualitative frame analysis identified three interrelated frames depicting hunting as battle, as consumption, and as privilege, all of which constitute and are consti-tuted by the underlying notion of human as superior to nature. It is suggested that these hegemonic nature frames suppress more constructive ways of framing the human-nature relationship, but also that the identification of such potential counter-hegemonic frames enables their discursive manifestation.

  • 33. Niskala, Niina
    et al.
    Hurme, Pertti
    The Other Stance: Conflicting Professional Self-Images and Perceptions of the Other Profession among Finnish PR Professionals and Journalists2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 105-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Public relations (PR) professionals and journalists act as builders of societies’ communica-tion atmospheres, and their inter-relationships are of importance. The aim of the present study is to describe and compare PR professionals’ and journalists’ professional self-images and perceptions of the other group’s profession in Finland. The study is part of the ProfCom project and makes use of the project’s Finnish quantitative questionnaire data. The results indicate clear perception differences. PR professionals identify themselves with bond- and trust-building objectives, whereas journalists perceive marketing and financial goals as the main objectives of PR professionals. Journalists identify themselves with information sharing, criticism and service roles, whereas PR professionals perceive opinion sharing, advising and informing about scandals as the main objectives of journalists. In addition, the study indicates a need for further research on the underlying reasons for conflicting perceptions and the effects of the developing Internet communication arena on relation-ships between professionals.

  • 34.
    Noske-Turner, Jessica
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    10 Years of Evaluation Practice in Media Assistance: Who, When, Why and How?2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 41-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evaluating the impact of media assistance is challenging for several reasons. Primary among them is that these kinds of initiatives operate in a complex political, social, and cultural environment. Although there has been increased attention to evaluation of media assistance, with a series of international conferences, funded research projects, and publications ad-dressing this topic, it remains a problematic area of practice. This paper provides a survey of recent media assistance evaluation practices through an analysis of 47 evaluation documents of programs and projects from 2002-2012, identifying trends in methodology choices, and critiquing the quality of the evidence enabled through different evaluation approaches. It finds clear patterns in how, when and by whom evaluations are undertaken, but finds that these practices rarely generate useful, insightful evaluations.

  • 35.
    Nybro Petersen, Line
    University of Sothern Denmark.
    ‘Generation Conviviality’: The Role of Media Logicin Television Production for Elderly Audiences2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no Special Issue 1, p. 25-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a production study of two talk shows for the Danish television channel, TV2 Charlie: Meyerheim’s Talk Show (2006-) and Cecilie’s Book Show (2015-). TV2 Charlie is a niche channel (part of the TV2 network) that set out to target a mature and elderly audience when it started in 2004. The aim is to bring together mediatization research with produc-tion studies and cultural gerontology, and I argue that media logic is a useful analy tical concept that allows us to describe production processes in concrete ways and, at the same time, understand the context-specific ways in which media play a role in societal changes. Thus, through a logic of operationalising convivialityat the channel level, the production level and the programme level, the programmes contribute to perceptions of ageing and old age that emphasise an increased need for stability and safety, on one hand, and a desire for feel-good moments, on the other. Furthermore, the programmes promote positive and active ageing in some instances while keeping old age invisible in other instances.

  • 36. Nygren, Gunnar
    et al.
    Dobek-Ostrowska, Boguslawa
    Anikina, Maria
    Professional autonomy: Challenges and Opportunities in Poland,Russia and Sweden2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 79-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Degree of autonomy is one of the key dimensions of professionalization in journalism.However, the strive for autonomy looks different in different media systems, where pressureon autonomy can come from both political and commercial powers, outside and withinthe media. Media development also changes the conditions for professional autonomy forjournalists, in both a positive and a negative sense. In the comparative research project“Journalism in change”, the journalistic cultures in Russia, Poland and Sweden are studied.In a survey involving 1500 journalists from the three countries, journalists report ontheir perceived autonomy in their daily work and in relation to different actors inside andoutside the media. The survey covers how the work has been changed by media developments,and how these changes have affected journalists´perceived autonomy. The resultsshow similarities in the strive for autonomy, but also clear differences in how autonomy isperceived by journalists in the three countries.

  • 37.
    Plush, Tamara
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Interrogating Practitioner Tensions for Raising Citizen Voice with Participatory Video in International Development2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 57-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within international development, strengthening the voice of citizens living in poverty is recognised as vital to reducing inequity. In support of such endeavors, participatory video (PV) is an increasingly utilised communicative method that can stimulate community engagement and amplify the voice of groups often excluded from decision-making spaces. However, implementing PV processes specifically within an international development context is an immensely complex proposal. Practitioners must take into consideration the different ways institutions may understand the use of participatory video for raising citizen voice; and how therefore the practice may be influenced, co-opted or even devalued by these institutional assumptions. To this end, this article interrogates how global PV practi-tioners express tension in their work. Analysis of their descriptions suggests six influential views on PV practice with the potential to diminish the value of voice from the margins.

  • 38.
    Pradip Ninan, Thomas
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Communication for Social Change, Making Theory Count2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article argues for communication for social change theory tobe based on a theory of knowledge, a specific understanding of process that feeds into practice, a knowledge of structures, a specific understanding of context and flows of power. It highlights the example of the Right to Information Movement in India as an embodiment of meaningful practice that was in itselfa response to the felt needs of people. It argues that the RTI movement provided opportunities to understand Voice as a practice and value through indigenous means, specifically through the mechanism ofthe Jan Sunwai (Public Hearings). It argues that when local people are involved in articulating ‘needs’, there will be scope for the sustainability of the practice of communication and social change and opportunities to theorise from suchpractice.

  • 39.
    Sand, Stine Agnete
    Lillehammer University College.
    How to Succeed with Film Production in the Regions?: A Study of Key Success Factors in the Norwegian Regional Film Business2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 113-125Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThis article explores what two regional film production companies in Norway do to sur-vive and succeed with their goals. The production of feature films in Norway is largely an Oslo-based effort, but despite this reality, there are companies in the regions that produce feature films. The analysis draws on semi-structured interviews with eight employees in two companies. Mer Film has in relatively short time managed to attract talented directors and establish networks with international, critically acclaimed production companies. Filmbinwas one of the first film companies in Norway who committed themselves to the produc-tion of films for children. The article shows that success must be related to context and that reputation, talent development and choice of genre, geographical location, networking and social capital, risk diversification, entrepreneurship, organizational culture and leadership,are essential factors for the companies

  • 40.
    Schofield, Daniel
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Kupiainen, Reijo
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Young People’s Narratives of Media and Identity: Mediagraphy as Identity Work in Upper Secondary School2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 79-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractThe article explores how upper secondary students use the learning activity mediagraphy to reflect on their identity and on media as constraining and enabling factors in their social practice. In mediagraphy, the students research four generations of their own families, including themselves. They write a mediagraphy essay on the differences and similarities across the generations in media use and turning points in individuals’ lives, in addition to societal and media-related developments. Data from student products and interviews are analysed through three “identity dilemmas” that any identity claim faces: the constant navigation between 1) continuity and change, 2) sameness and difference with regard to others, and 3) agency as “person-to-world” and “world-to-person”. The findings suggest that mediagraphy is a type of identity work that can potentially help students develop an agentive identity in a time of insecurity, with rapidly shifting social and cultural conditions and increasing media density.

  • 41.
    Sjøvaag, Helle
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    The Emergence of Metropolitan News: Shifting Concepts of Localismin Norwegian Regional Newspapers2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a quantitative and comparative content analysis of four Norwegianregional newspapers owned by the Schibsted Media Group. The aim of the analysis is toestablish levels of localism in the online and printed editions of the newspapers and todiscuss the relation between the local, regional, metropolitan and national news levels ontwo publishing platforms. Results show that the local profile is increasingly becoming thedefining feature of these regional newspapers, even more so online than in print. As theanalysis shows an increase in the amount of everyday life-related stories in the local newscontent, this study finds that Norwegian regional newspapers are moving towards a moremetropolitan profile.

  • 42. Storsul, Tanja
    Deliberation or Self-presentation?: Young People, Politics and Social Media2014In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 17-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of how politically engaged young people use social media for political purposes. There has been a growing optimism that social media can stimu-late political participation and deliberation, especially among young people. Based on focus group interviews with Norwegian teenagers, the article argues that social media have become an important platform for young people to participate in political activities. Whether the purpose is internal meetings or external mobilization, social media provide platforms for planning, reporting and communicating political activities. At the same time, politically engaged young people are hesitant about using social media for politi-cal deliberation. They are concerned about how they present themselves, and they are reluctant to stand out as highly political. One important explanation for this is that social media integrate different forms of communication and collapse social contexts. This causes teenagers to delimit controversies and try to keep political discussions to groups with more segregated audiences.

  • 43.
    Turnbull, Gemma-Rose
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    Surface Tension: Navigating Socially Engaged Documentary Photographic Practices2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no Special Issue, p. 79-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As Documentary Photographers increasingly introduce the collaborative and participatory methodologies common to socially engaged art practices into their projects (particularly those that are activist in nature, seeking to catalyse social change agendas and policies through image making and sharing), there is an increased tension between the process of production and the photographic representation that is created. Over the course of the last five years I have utilised these methodologies of co-authorship. This article contextualizes this kind of transdisciplinary work, and examines the ways in which the integration of col-laborative strategies and co-authored practice in projects that are explicitly designed to be of benefit to a primary audience (the participants, collaborators and producers) might be usefully disseminated to a secondary audience (the general public, the ‘art world’, critics etc.) through analysis of my projects Red Light Dark Room; Sex, lives and stereotypes made in Melbourne, Australia, and The King School Portrait Project made in Portland, Oregon, America.

  • 44. Ustad Figenschou, Tine
    et al.
    Beyer, Audun
    Thorbjørnsrud, Kjersti
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    The Moral Police: Agenda-setting and Framing Effects of a New(s) Concept of Immigration2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 65-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How does the general public understand media coverage of immigration issues? The present article analyses the media effects of an extensive news series focusing on the harassment of people believed to disrespect traditional Muslim norms. Through an explorative survey study, it traces how Norwegian media launched and covered what was labeled “the moral police” phenomenon, and to what extent the media framing of the issue had an agenda-setting and/or frame-setting effect on the public. It finds that, although most respondents had become aware of the issue through the media, they did not necessarily adopt the media’s framing of the phenomenon. The respondents did not primarily relate the “moral police” to immigration (the dominant media frame), they understood the new phenomenon through experiences from their own lives and framed it as a general social problem.

  • 45.
    Valtysson, Bjarki
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    After the Performance: A Mayor’s Diary on Facebook2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In May 2010, the Best Party won the municipal elections in Reykjavik, and the party’sleading figure, comedian Jón Gnarr, was appointed Mayor of Reykjavik. During the electioncampaign, the party ‘performed democracy’ by playing with irrational, satirical discoursesthat challenged traditional discourses within political public spheres. Soon afterhis inauguration, Gnarr began a Facebook page called ‘The Mayor’s Diary’ on which hewrote openly about the challenges faced by a newcomer to politics. Approximately 10%of the Icelandic population follows his profile. This article presents an analysis of thecommunication conducted on the Mayor’s Diary, particularly of how Facebook as a mediaenvironment conditions the Mayor’s performative manoeuvres and, correspondingly, howthe subversive discourses galvanised in the election campaign can begin ricocheting backwhen discussions move from cultural public spheres to political public spheres.

  • 46. Vesa, Juho
    Nordic Openness in Practice: Loose Coupling of Government Communicationand Policy-making in Finland2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 129-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the tradition of ‘Nordic openness’, and intensified by international trends, the normof policy-making transparency is strong in Finland. Inspired by organizational institutionalism,the present article studies what this notion of transparency means in practice. A casestudy of a social security reform committee is presented. The consensus-building practicestypical of Finnish corporatist policy-making significantly constrained the transparency ofgovernment communication during the lifetime of the committee. The government communicatedactively in public to meet the demand for transparency; but in order to secureeffective bargaining, the government communicated issues concerning the committee sovaguely that it did not inspire wide public discussion. Public discussion was instead mainlyfuelled by leaks. These findings suggest that a strong norm of transparency can lead toceremonial transparency, where government public communication is loosely coupled withpolicy-making practices. These ceremonies might strengthen the notion of Nordic openness

  • 47. Vettenranta, Soilikki
    Crisis Communication and the Norwegian Authorities 22 July and the Chernobyl Disaster: Two Catastrophes, Dissimilar Outcomes2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article examines how crisis communication after catastrophes can strengthen society or undermine trust, credibility and confidence between the authorities and the general public. The two cases examined are the Norwegian authorities’ communicative response to the Chernobyl power plant disaster on 26 April, 1986, and the terrorist attacks on the government complex in Oslo and the Labour Party youth camp on the island of Utøya on 22 July, 2011. The analysis compares the initial phase of crisis communication. A serious communication crisis arose between the authorities and the public after Chernobyl, while communication during the early days after 22 July was successful. The difference is explained by the concept of rationality; crisis communication after Chernobyl was based on technical rationality, whereas communication after the terror attacks was grounded on the rationality of caring. The theoretical framework originates from Heidegger’s existential phenomenology with special focus on the existentiales Being-in-the-World,State of Mindand Care.

  • 48.
    von Krogh, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Affiliated to Demicom, Mid Sweden University.
    Svensson, Göran
    Department of Informatics and Media, Uppsala University.
    Media Responses to Media Criticism: An Analysis of Response Practices in the Weekly Swedish Podcast MattssonHelin2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 47-64Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the time of writing in June 2015, the top Swedish tabloid editors, Thomas Mattsson and Jan Helin, Editors-in-Chief for the competing news organisations, Expressen and Aftonbladet, have produced 116 weekly issues of their joint podcast “MattssonHelin”. An examination of 24 samples of the content regarding responses to media criticism shows that the responses can be categorised in eleven groups that range from total rejection to total acceptance. Our categorisation presents a complement to earlier research on media responses to criticism. The responses contain elements of paradigm repair for journalism (Berkowitz 2000) but also illuminate how the editors use the particular advantages of the podcast format to enhance their take on public media literacy. Their presence in this par-ticular digital platform allows for long and nuanced discussions on journalistic practice in relation to media criticism, albeit on their own terms.

  • 49.
    Vähämaa, Miika
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    West, Mark D
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NORDICOM.
    “They Say One Thing and Mean Another” How Differences in In-Group Understandings of Key Goals Shape Political Knowledge: An International Comparison of Politicians and Journalists2015In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Journalists and politicians play different roles in the functional structure of the Habermasian public sphere; as such, they might be expected to have different understandings of what knowledge production and transmission might mean. This difference of understanding is more than a conflict over definitions; it is an epistemic divergence à la Fuller (2002:220), where already defined groups hold divergent understandings of what constitutes understand-ing. While a substantial body of work has been based on the idea of epistemic communities in the context of science and expert organizations in general, little empirical research exists to demonstrate the validity and adaptability of the concept of epistemic communities in comparative political communication research. Here, we show the cross-national validity of the concept of epistemic communities in the context of professional groups of politicians and political journalists in Austria, Finland, France, Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

  • 50.
    Yagodin, Dmitry
    et al.
    School of Communication, Media and Theatre, University of Tampere.
    Tegelberg, Matthew
    Department of Social Science, York University.
    Donors Do Not Trust: Actor-Networks and Intermedia Agenda-Setting in Online Climate News2017In: Nordicom Review, ISSN 1403-1108, E-ISSN 2001-5119, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 97-112Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AbstractFocusing on a story exposing Donors Trust (DT) as a funding source for climate denial campaigns, we introduce actor-network theory (ANT) as a methodological tool for study-ing online intermedia agenda-setting. The DT story, unveiled by prominent British media in early 2013, had the potential to become a global media sensation. However, this did not occur in two distinct communication actor-networks, Russia and Canada, raising questions regarding climate change journalism and agenda-setting in contemporary networked news environments. This article takes a fresh approach to studying agenda-setting processes by using ANT to trace connections between national climate agendas, networks of power and sites of mediated information. By mapping ties between attributes of DT story actor-networks, it illuminates moments that preclude or facilitate intermedia agenda-setting in online media networks. This demonstrates ANT’s potential to help better understand processes of information dissemination in an era characterised by the exceptional intercon-nectedness of media landscapes

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