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  • 1. Agung Banyu Perwita, Anak
    Indonesia and the Muslim World: Between Islam and Secularism in the Foreign Policy of Soeharto and Beyond2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    opular hostility and official ambivalence in Indonesia to the United States-led ‘War on Terror’ seem easily understandable in in the world’s largest Muslim country. But this kind of analysis misses the complexity of Indonesia and the host of internal differences behind this opposition. Military and bureaucratic elites since independence have worked to create a more secular nationalist Indonesian identity out of a multi-ethnic/religious mix, often provoking religious opposition. This dynamic (found also in Turkey, for instance) has especially shaped Indonesia’s encounter with and view of the outside world – and not least its reaction to events affecting the Muslim world.

    In this study, the author explores Islam as a domestic political variable in Indonesia’s foreign policy since independence. Here, Anak Agung Banyu Perwita argues that increasingly Indonesia’s foreign policy toward the Muslim world has become based on domestic political struggles. In support of his argument, the author mainly draws on material from the period when President Soeharto’s New Order regime ruled Indonesia but brings in more recent material from the post-Soeharto era to demonstate how Indonesian foreign policy is still shaped by the same forces today.

    Containing a wealth of information on the role of Islam in Indonesia’s foreign policy, this book is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand how the world’s largest Muslim country is reacting to the international challenges of the modern world.

  • 2. Al-Badri, Dominic
    et al.
    Berends, Gijs
    After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Political and Policy Change in Post-Fukushima Japan2013Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The triple disaster that struck Japan in March 2011 began with the most powerful earthquake known to have hit Japan and led to tsunami up to 40 meters in height that devastated a wide area and caused thousands of deaths. The ensuing accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant was Japan’s worst and only second to Chernobyl in its severity.

     

    But has this triple disaster also changed Japan? Has it led to a transformation of the country, a shift in how Japan functions? This book, with fresh perspectives on extraordinary events written by diplomats and policy experts at European embassies to Japan, explores subsequent shifts in Japanese politics and policy-making to see if profound changes have occurred or if instead these are limited.

     

    The book addresses those policy areas most likely to be affected by the tragedy – politics, economics, energy, climate, agriculture and food safety – describes how the sector has been affected and considers what the implications are for the future.

  • 3. Andersen, Peter B.
    et al.
    Soren, Santosh K.
    The Bodo of Assam: Revisiting a Classical Study from 19502015Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bodo (or Boros) are one of the indigenous tribal peoples of Assam. During colonial times they resisted Christianization and in recent decades they have been involved both in interethnic violence and separatist insurgencies. Much research has gone into understanding the Boros and their aspirations but an issue has been that earlier accounts of this once-animist people are meagre and date from the colonial period. The rediscovery and publication of the ethnographic material based on fieldwork carried out by Halfdan Siiger among the Boros in 1949–50 is thus hugely important. Siiger’s manuscript is unique, offering detailed descriptions of the social and ritual life of the Boros and new insights into the traditions and myths as they were told in the village he studied before the transformation of religious life in recent decades. Thanks to Siiger’s diligent translation and interpretation, the manuscript also preserves a number of ritual formulas and songs in the Boro language. Siiger’s manuscript is given even greater relevance by the inclusion of more recent material contributed by the editors and other contemporary scholars. In addition, his original photos are augmented by new photos from the village and by rare images from the collections of the National Museum of Denmark. 

  • 4. Bakken, Børge
    Migration in China1998Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Economic reform in China has led to an internal migration of people within the world's most populous nation on a scale never seen before. Since China's new industrial revolution began in the late 1970s, there has been a flow of tens of millions (perhaps even hundreds of millions) of surplus labour and their families moving from rural to urban areas. This phenomenon has been described in terms of both a blessing for China's economic growth and a threat against its social order.

    Contributors to this edited volume look at the different aspects of internal Chinese migration. The volume also briefly introduces current research and gives pointers to methodological traps and misunderstandings that can occur in the field.

  • 5. Bangsbo, Ellen
    Teaching and Learning in Tibet: A Review of Research Policy Publications2006Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of schooling and education for Tibetan children in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) is the focus of increasing national and international attention. Here, special attention has been given to the concept of ‘quality education’. One should be aware that this concept is understood differently by different groups. Educationalists and NGOs with programmes in Tibet view ‘quality education’ from the international perspective of methodology and pedagogy; here, the aim is to teach children to think independently. In contrast, Chinese authorities promote ‘quality education’ as an antidote to ‘exam-oriented education’ and as a means to support nationalistic, patriotic and moral education. The challenge is to bridge these two views.

    To this end, Teaching and Learning in Tibet provides an unbiased and comprehensive guide to documents and publications on schooling and education in Tibet dealing with issues relating to ‘quality education’, teaching and curriculum, bi- and trilingual teaching policies, teachers’ education, ‘key-schools’, access to school, and other challenges related to schooling in Tibet.

  • 6. Bankoff, Greg
    et al.
    Swart, Sandra
    Breeds of Empire: The ’Invention’ of the Horse in Southeast Asia and Southern Africa 1500-19502011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Ships of empire carried not just merchandise, soldiers and administrators but also equine genes from as far a field as Europe, Arabia, the Americas, China and Japan. In the process, they introduced horses into parts of the world not native to that animal in historical times. As a result, horses in Thailand, the Philippine Horses, the Cape Horse in South Africa and the Basotho Pony in the mountain kingdom of Lesotho share a genetic lineage with the horse found in the Indonesian archipelago.

    This book explores the ‘invention’ of specific breeds of horse in the context of imperial design and colonial trade routes. Here, it focuses on the introduction, invention and use of the horse in Thailand, the Philippines and southern Africa as well as examining its roots and evolution within Indonesia. In addition, it examines the colonial trade in horses within the Indian Ocean and discusses the historiographical and methodological problems associated with writing a more species or horse-centric history.

    This is a fascinating study that will appeal not only to scholars but also to the broad horse-reading public interested in all things equine.

  • 7. Barr, Michael D.
    et al.
    Skrbiš, Zlatko
    Constructing Singapore: Elitism, Ethnicity and the Nation-Building Project2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Singapore has few natural resources but, in a relatively short history, its economic and social development and transformation are nothing short of remarkable. Today Singapore is by far the most successful exemplar of material development in Southeast Asia and it often finds itself the envy of developed countries. Furthermore over the last three or four decades the ruling party has presided over the formation of a thriving community of Singaporeans who love and are proud of their country.

    Nothing about these processes has been 'natural' in any sense of the word. Much of the country's investment in nation-building has in fact gone into the selection, training and formation of a ruling and administrative elite that reflects and will perpetuate its vision of the nation. The government ownership of the nation-building project, its micromanagement of everyday life and the role played by the elite are three fundamental elements in this complex and continuing process of construction of a natrion. The intense triangulation of these elements and the pace of change they produce make Singapore one of the most intriguing specimens of nation-building in the region.

    In this critical study of the politics of ethnicity and elitism in Singapore, Barr and Skrbiš look inside the supposedly 'meritocratic' system, from nursery school to university and beyond, that produces Singapore's political and administrative elite. Focusing on two processes - elite formation and elite selection - they give primary attention to the role that etho-racial ascription plays in these processes but also consider the input of personal connections, personal power, class and gender. The result is a study revealing much about how Singapore's elite-led nation-building project has reached its current state whereby a Singaporean version of Chinese ethno-nationalism has overwhelmed the discourse on national and Singaporean identity.

  • 8. Becker, John
    Pattern and Loom: A Practical Study of the Development of Weaving Techniques in China, Western Asia and Europe2014Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    When John Becker’s Pattern and Loom was posthumously published in 1987, the work was hailed as an important work that revealed much new knowledge on the development of weaving techniques across the centuries from China through to Europe. The key to the book’s almost forensic investigation of its subject was the author himself, a Danish damask weaver with a lifetime’s practical experience in his craft and an intimate knowledge of weaving techniques that allowed him to decipher, experiment and interpret original techniques from small remnants of surviving material. Long out of print, the work has been tidied and reset by Becker’s collaborator on the original work, the sinologist Don Wagner.

     

  • 9. Benediktsson, Karl
    Harvesting Development: The Construction of Fresh Food Markets in Papua New Guinea2002Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This book addresses the global–local tension evident in much work on development issues, through the example of fresh food markets in Papua New Guinea. A key feature is the author’s skilful and inventive interweaving of theoretical constructs with a detailed ethnography of marketing networks, at the rural village and the urban market-place, as well as in the ‘spaces in between’.

    The work shows the rural community not as an isolated universe, but as consisting of dynamic linkages and networks which extend way beyond the locality. At the same time, local actors with their own agendas and interpretations of the metanarrative of ‘development’ are shown to be crucially important for shaping the outcome of the market integration process.

    This book is of relevance to geographers, anthropologists, sociologists and economists dealing with development issues. It is also an important read for Oceanianists/Melanesianists as it tackles processes and problems, which few ethnographers, who have worked in Papua New Guinea, have made their central concern. It is suitable for courses in development studies, geography and human ecology, and Oceanic studies, at advanced undergraduate or postgraduate level. While it deals with complex theoretical issues, it is written in a clear and accessible language. This makes the book a worthwhile read also for those outside of academia, for instance in government or international agencies, who work with rural development issues and design and monitor development projects.

  • 10. Beresford, Melanie
    et al.
    Tran, Angie Ngoc
    Reaching for the Dream: Challenges of Sustainable Development in Vietnam2004Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Transition economies allow the study of fundamental questions about the nature of markets. How do they arise and do they necessarily follow the same modus operandi as markets in other countries? How does the state influence the development of markets? How does the opening of the economy to global market influences affect the process of institutional change? How do people respond to both internal and external influences? And how in the context of an underdeveloped transitional economy like Vietnam, do such influences affect the prospects for sustainable and equitable development?

    This book focuses on the differentiated ways in which the double transition in Vietnam, from central planning and from under-development, affects various sectors of the population.

  • 11. Brox, Trine
    et al.
    Bellér-Hann, Ildikó
    On the Fringes of the Harmonious Society: Tibetans and Uyghurs in Socialist China2014Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1949, Tibetans and Uyghurs generally have been perceived as the two most problematic members of the PRC’s great family of peoples and been the targets of ‘carrot and stick’ measures designed to facilitate their integration into the PRC. In recent years, a solution to the problem of Xinjiang and the Tibet has been sought in accelerated economic development, yet this is perceived by both groups with great suspicion. Addressing this situation, the volume explores the arenas of socio-economic development and market liberalization, popular culture, urban planning and relocation, environment and ecological migration, civil society, education and language, ethno-nationalism, as well as religious policies and practices. It is especially topical at a time when fieldwork in the regions where these two minorities live remains extremely difficult and politically sensitive.

     

  • 12.
    Bruun, Ole
    Nordiska ministerrådet, NIAS - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies.
    Fengshui in China: Geomantic Divination between State, Orthodoxy and Popular Religion2011 (oppl. 2nd ed.)Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    For well over a century, Chinese fengshui - or 'geomancy' - has interested Western laymen and scholars. Today, hundreds of popular manuals claim to use its principles in their advice on how people can increase their wealth, happiness, longevity, etc. This study is quite different, approaching fengshui from an academic angle. The focus is on fengshui's significance in China, but the recent history of its reinterpretation in the West is also depicted.

    The author argues that fengshui serves as an alternative tradition of cosmological knowledge, which is used to explain a range of everyday occurrences in rural areas such as disease, mental disorders, accidents and common mischief. Although Chinese authorities have opposed the tradition for centuries, nonetheless it has been used by almost everyone as an aspect of popular cosmology. Opposing the Chinese collectivist ethos and moralizing from above, fengshui represents an alternative vision of reality, while interpreting essential Chinese values in a way that sanctions selfish motivations and behaviour.

    The study includes a historical account of fengshui over the last 150 years augmented by the results of anthropological fieldwork on contemporary practices in two Chinese rural areas. Aiming to eschew Western intellectual preconceptions and to penetrate the confused mass of old texts and divergent local practices, the book will be of interest to all scholars seeking to understand an undercurrent of modern China's transformation.

  • 13. Bruun, Ole
    et al.
    Narangoa, Li
    Mongols From Country to City: Floating Boundaries, Pastoralism and City Life in the Mongol Lands2011Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    • Analyses cultural change not only in Mongolia but also in the wider Mongol lands in China and Russia.

    • Brings focus and a wealth of new material not previously published to a previously sparse and fragmented field of study.

    • Combines the work of several internationally recognized scholars with that of a group of young but innovative new scholars

  • 14. Brødsgaard, Kjeld Erik
    et al.
    Kirkebæk, Mads
    China and Denmark: Relations since 16742000Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first comprehensive study to analyse in detail the evolving political, economic and diplomatic relationship between China and Denmark since their first contact in 1674. The book is thoroughly researched and based on newly available source material in Chinese as well as in Western languages. It is an important contribution to the growing literature on China’s relations with the West since the beginning of the modern period.

  • 15. Buescher, Hartmut
    Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts: Early Acquisitions and the Nepal Collection2010Bok (Annet vitenskapelig)
    Abstract [en]

    This first-ever catalogue in English of the Danish National Library's rich Sanskrit holdings analyses and describes three of the manuscript collections held by the library.

    The first is the Codices Sanscriti, collected in the early nineteenth century by the pioneer comparative linguist, Rasmus Rask, comprises both palm-leaf and paper manuscripts, most written in either Bengali, Telugu or Sinhalese script.

    The second - the Codices Indici - was collected by the surgeon and botanist, Nathanael Wallich (well-known for his involvement in the foundation of the Indian Museum and Botanical Garden atCalcutta). Mostly written in Bengali script on locally produced country paper, most of these codices pertain to the genre of Ayurveda.

    The third and largest collection originates from Nepal and was collected in the 1950s by the cultural anthropologist Werner Jacobsen. Its highly heterogenous nature reflects the fact that Jacobsen had an ethnographical curator's eye for curious objects.

    Together these comprise a rich offering to philologists, anthropologists and historians of religion, art and iconography.

  • 16. Børdahl, Vibeke
    Wu Song Fights the Tiger: The Interaction of Oral and Written Traditions in the Chinese Novel, Drama and Storytelling2013Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of Chinese literary studies has long been on the written word even though Chinese fiction and drama have strong oral roots and have been shaped by an interplay between oral and written traditions. The culmination of decades working on this issue – and using as its lens the story about how the legendary hero Wu Song killed a tiger with his bare hands – this volume explores Chinese oral professional storytelling and its relations with literary culture in the past and present.

  • 17. Børdahl, Vibeke
    et al.
    Li, FeiYing, Huang
    Four Masters of Chinese Storytelling: Full-length Repertoires of Yangzhou Storytelling on Video2004Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    • Offers access to and brings alive unique materials on the Chinese storytelling traditions.

    • First time that storytellers? repertoires are registered in theirentirety.

    • Useful for students of Chinese culture by serving as a bilingual guide to the great masterworks of the Chinese novel (Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey to the West).

  • 18. Børdahl, Vibeke
    et al.
    Wan, Margaret B.
    The Interplay of the Oral and the Written in Chinese Popular Literature2010Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]
    • Examines the interrelationship between oral (or performing) and written traditions in Chinese popular literature
    • Offers enquiries into new material and gives astonishing responses to old controversies
    • Provides interdisciplinary perspectives on Chinese popular entertainment literature from the Ming dynasty to the present
    • Makes an excellent contribution to the literature in its field.

     

  • 19. C. Hoadley, Mason
    Southeast Asian - Centred Economies or Economics?1999Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This book is not a definitive research statement nor yet another account of Asia's financial crisis. Rather, it offers Southeast Asian perspectives quite at variance to orthodox Western economic thinking.

    Topics range from macro perspectives of Indonesia's Economi Pancasilaand Thailand's Buddhist Economics, through Malaysia's Islamic financial institutions, to regional and international perspectives of the remaining ASEAN countries and the IMF/World Bank, all tied up by setting them within a diachronic, historical framework. In so doing, this volume looks to open up challenging and provocative fields of research essential for a real understanding of Southeast Asia and it's current economic standing.

  • 20. Chandler, David
    et al.
    Kent, Alexandra
    People of Virtue: Reconfiguring Religion, Power and Moral Order in Cambodia Today2009Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Much attention has been given to the ‘killing fields’ of Cambodia, far less to how the country can recover and heal itself after such an experience. Crucial to this process has been the formation of a new moral order in Cambodia and hence the revival of religion in the country.

    Certainly, the regeneration of the ritual life of a community may offer ways for people to formulate and relate to their collective stories through symbolism that recalls a shared cultural origin. However, this process requires that the representatives of religion and of morality do have credibility and moral authority, something that may be called into question by their past and present involvement in hegemonic political and secular affairs.

    The importance of this volume, therefore, is not only that it contributes to the new interest in religion in Cambodia but also because it places the religious revival in a nuanced social, cultural and political context and shows how Cambodia pursues order in large part through reference to her past.

  • 21. Christensen, Asger
    Aiding Afghanistan: The Background and Prospects for Reconstruction in a Fragmented Society1995Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Examines how the structure and dynamics of Afghan society shaped not only earlier relations between state and society but also the resistance struggle and civil war, and still affect international efforts towards the country's reconstruction.

  • 22. Connors, Michael Kelly
    Democracy and National Identity in Thailand2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This revised and updated edition of the widely praised Democracy and National Identity in Thailand provides readers with a fascinating discussion of how debates about democracy and national identity in Thailand have evolved from the period of counter-insurgency in the 1960s to the current (post-coup) period.

    Focusing on state- and civil society-centred democratic projects, Connors uses original Thai language sources to trace how the Thai state developed a democratic ideology that meshed with idealized notions of Thai identity, focusing on the monarchy. The book moves on to explore how non-state actors have mobilized notions of democracy and national identity in their battle against authoritarian rule.

    A new chapter explores the fate of the democratic project under the Thaksin regime. Using an approach applicable to the study of other democratizing societies, Democracy and National Identity in Thailand invites readers to explore democratic ideology as a form of power aimed at creating ideal citizens able to support elite national projects.

  • 23. Couderc, Pascal
    et al.
    Sillander, Kenneth
    Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation, and Social Immortality2012Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    While death, eschatology and exotic indigenous deathways have long held a privileged position in the ethnographic and popular literature on Borneo, ancestors have remained a strangely neglected topic. This volume fills this lacuna by presenting a collection of essays on ancestors in Borneo societies written by anthropologists with extensive experience in the field and drawing on new scholarship in kinship and animism studies.

    Belying the unimportance of ancestors in the literature, the essays document a complex significance of ancestors in Borneo religion and social life. Ancestors appear in a variety of manifestations and contexts, including as guests or distant beneficiaries of offerings in mortuary and community rituals, as village guardians and personal protecting spirits, as assistants in curing rituals and warfare, as unsolicited visitors in dreams and involuntary possession, and as sources of political authority, cultural legitimacy, and collective identity in public discourse. The pattern of relating to ancestors that emerges from this close collaborative effort differs from classic ethnographic representations of ancestor worship based on Sino-African material, and broadens the theoretical and comparative understanding of the subject.

    Exploring at depth complex questions about the constitution of ancestorship and how ancestral status is established – and the role in this regard of death, kinship, prowess, morality and ritual – this volume will not just be of interest to regional specialists but also will enrich the general anthropological theory of ancestors, kinship and religion.

  • 24. Cramb, R. A.
    Land and Longhouse: Agrarian Transformation in the Uplands of Sarawak2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This book examines the role of community, market and state in the historic transformation of upland livelihoods in Southeast Asia. Focusing on the Saribas Iban of Sarawak, the book combines in-depth, generation-long village case studies with an account of changes in land use and tenure at the regional level spanning a century and a half. This analysis demonstrates that, far from being passive victims of globalization, the Iban have been active agents in their own transformation, engaging with both market and state while retaining community values and governance.

    Dr Cramb makes a significant new contribution to debates about economic, social and environmental change and conflict in upland Southeast Asia. His book offers a fascinating, empirically rich account of interest to scholars, development practitioners and the general reader alike.

  • 25. Derichs, Claudia
    et al.
    Heberer, Thomas
    The Power of Ideas: Intellectual Input and Political Change in East and Southeast Asia2011Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional approach to studying the politics of a region is to focus on events, personalities, issues – the mechanics of the political process. What this volume looks to do is to step back and examine ideas and visions, as well as those who articulate them and/or put them into operation. The contributors thus aim to conceptualize what discourse means for political change in East and Southeast Asia, and how ideas in discourses affect political practice. As well as theorizing on the roles of intellectuals, ideas and discourses for processes of democratization, reform and change, the chapters also offer deep insights into the national and local, into the general and the specific situation of the selected countries.

    The volume touches upon three themes. One reflects the relationship of different actor groups – such as the state, NGOs, social movements, and intellectuals. Another reveals the multi-layered structure of discourses, which emerge from different opportunity structures of public discussion and may overlap with regard to certain topics. These differences reflect, thirdly, the various directions and types of change a discourse hints at – incremental change, radical change, ‘customized’ change, patterned change etc. These issues are analyzed in the case of two authoritarian states (China, Vietnam), a multi-ethnic, formally democratic state with strong authoritarian leanings (Malaysia), and two democratic states with significant parochial structures and patterns of behaviour (South Korea, Japan).

  • 26. Earl, Catherine
    Vietnam’s New Middle Classes: Gender, Career, City2014Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume explores the social consequences of macro-economic reform introduced in Vietnam more than a quarter of a century ago through a focus on young women graduates who hope to find success in Ho Chi Minh City’s growing graduate labour market. They are part of Vietnam’s new middle class, an educated and affluent segment of society growing with the rapid urbanization of Vietnam’s major cities.

              Drawing on a rich person-centred ethnography supplemented with middle-class Vietnamese women’s published autobiographies, it reveals how opportunities for professional work, further education, and leisure lifestyling attract young migrants, particularly female graduates, to Vietnam’s mega-urban Southeast region. Centred on Ho Chi Minh City, it argues that Vietnam’s Southeast enables young women, so long as they remain single, to realize aspirations for betterment that affect not only their own lives, but those of their families and communities who remain in rural Vietnam. It highlights the socio-cultural and material benefits realized through remittances received from urban daughters to emphasize the salience of kinship during periods of social transformation.

              The volume concludes with a wide-ranging look at the emergence of middle classes in Pacific Asia in order to locate the Vietnamese new middle class within a globalizing context.

  • 27. Eklöf, Stefan
    Indonesian Politics in Crisis: The Long Fall of Suharto, 1996-981999Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite a severe economic crisis, social unrest and growing pressure for political change in Indonesia, President Suharto’s hold on power seemed secure. Recent events have proved this otherwise. By describing the unfolding events since 1996, tracing the economic and social background, analysing the government's response and evaluating the actors most likely to shape Indonesia's future, this study provides key insights for understanding current and imminent processes of political change in Indonesia.

  • 28. Eklöf, Stefan
    Pirates in Paradise: A Modern History of Southeast Asia’s Maritime Marauders2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Tracing the development of piracy in Southeast Asia from the eighteenth century until today, this book provides profound insights into contemporary terrorism, piracy and transnational organized crime in the region.

    Since the late twentieth century, piracy has returned to the world's oceans with a vengeance. Worst hit is Southeast Asia where thousands of people have lost their lives at the hands of pirates in the last 25 years. Here, oil tankers, cargo ships, passenger vessels, fishing boats and pleasure yachts all have been targets of ruthless attacks.

    But who are these modern sea robbers who continue to infest the waters of Southeast Asia? Why have they not been suppressed by the security forces of the region? How serious is the problem for international shipping, for fishermen and for governments? This book is the first attempt to address these questions in a comprehensive and integrated manner.

  • 29. Eklöf, Stefan
    Power and Political Culture in Suharto's Indonesia: The Indonesian Democratic Party (PDI) and Decline of the New Order (1986-98)2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Under Indonesia's authoritarian New Order regime, the continued existence of the Indonesian Democratic Party (PDI) was meant to demonstrate the ostensibly democratic character of the regime. In essence, this small nationalist-Christian coalition was meant to rfill the role of pliant state corporatist party. From the later 1980s, however, the PDI became more openly critical of government policies and came to stand out as the major proponent of reform within the formal politica system. The govenrment responded in 1996 by engineering the removal of the populat Megwati Sukarnoputri as PDI leader, a move that significantly damaged the popular legitimacy and moral standing of the regime.

    Against this background, the book assesses broader questions of political culture, political participation, regime maintenance and opposition in the late Suharto era. The political culture perspective provides a fresh understanding of politics under the New Order and its influence on the systems of power and political relations in post-Suharto Indonesia.

  • 30. Endres, Kirsten W.
    Performing the Divine: Mediums, Markets and Modernity in Urban Vietnam2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Vietnam in the last two decades has experienced not only market reform and significant economic growth but also a related, symbiotic revival of popular religion. It is no surprise, then, that popular beliefs and rituals that once were attacked as wasteful and superstitious have again become a conspicuous feature of contemporary urban and rural life.

    A new blossoming of spirit mediumship has been part of this revival, not least that involving ritual possession by the deities of the Four Palace Pantheon, which this study based in urban Hanoi brings to life with a deft handling of complex theory, historical research, ethnographic material and analysis.

    This is indeed a sojourn into the world of mediumship in contemporary urban Vietnam - a spirited world full of colour, laughter, music and ritual dance that operates according to its own rules and principles - but it is also an insightful study of spirituality, performance, gender and heritage, one that highlights the fluidity of ritual practice and contestations of ritual performance among practitioners.

  • 31. Falk, Monica Lindberg
    Making Fields of Merit: Buddhist Female Ascetics and Gendered Orders in Thailand2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Religion plays a central role in Thai society with Buddhism intertwined in the daily lives of the people. Religion also plays an important role in establishing gender boundaries. The growth in recent decades of self-governing nunneries (samnak chii) and the increasing interest of Thai women in a Buddhist monastic life are notable changes in the religion–gender dynamic.

    This anthropological study addresses religion and gender relations through the lens of the lives, actions and role in Thai society of an order of Buddhist nuns (mae chii). It presents an unique ethnography of these Thai Buddhist nuns, examines what it implies to be a female ascetic in contemporary Thailand and analyses how the ordained state for women fits into the wider gender patterns found in Thai society. The study also deals with the nuns’ agency in creating religious space and authority for women. In addition, it raises questions about how the position of Thai Buddhist nuns outside the Buddhist sangha affects their religious legitimacy and describes recent moves to restore a Theravada order of female monks.

     

  • 32. Fischer, Andrew Martin
    State Growth and Social Exclusion in Tibet: Challenges of Recent Economic Growth2005Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The most pressing economic challenges facing the Tibetan areas of western China relate to the marginalization of the majority of Tibetans from rapid state-led growth. The urban-rural divide plays an impor-tant role in this polarized dynamic but alone only partially explains differences with other Chinese regions, all of which generally exhibit strong spatial inequalities.

    This book therefore focuses on several further factors that determine the ethnically exclusionary character of current peripheral growth in the Tibetan areas. These include processes of urbanization, immigration, employment and education as key factors underlying structural economic change. The study draws generally from the analytical framework of social exclusion and is based on extensive use of official Chinese statistics, focusing on the Tibet Autonomous Region and Qinghai but with numerous comparisons to the other provinces of western China. A variety of qualitative insights are also taken from recent fieldwork and second-ary sources. The macro focus of this investigation aims to complement the growing wealth of micro-level studies on Tibet produced from a variety of disciplines.

  • 33. Fischer, Johan
    Proper Islamic Consumption: Shopping among the Malays in Modern Malaysia2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The West has seen the rise of the organic movement. In the Muslim world, a similar halal movement is rapidly spreading. Exploring consumption practices in urban Malaysia, this book shows how diverse forms of Malay middle-class consumption (of food, clothing and cars, for example) are understood, practised and contested as a particular mode of modern Islamic practice.

    The book illustrates ways in which the issue of ‘proper Islamic consumption’ for consumers, the marketplace and the state in contemporary Malaysia evokes a whole range of contradictory Islamic visions, lifestyles and debates articulating what Islam is or ought to be. Its rich empirical material on everyday consumption in a local context will reinvigorate theoretical discussions about the nature of religion, ritual, the sacred and capitalism in the new millennium.

  • 34. Fjeld, Heidi
    Commoners and Nobles: Hereditary Divisions in Tibet2005Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Written by one of the few scholars who has been able to conduct long-term fieldwork in the TAR, this study explores how Tibetans manoeuvre within two contradictory value systems - those of old Tibet and the new PRC - balancing between ideals and pragmatism.

    More specifically, it asks how and why it is that the social categories of pre-communist Lhasa persist and are made relevant in daily life despite decades of Chinese rule and the comprehensive restructuring of Tibetan society. More specifically, particular attention is given to the former nobility of Lhasa and their ascribed role as custodians of Tibetan culture.

  • 35. Fredholm, Michael
    The Shanghai Cooperation Organization and Eurasian Geopolitics: New Directions, Perspectives, and Challenges2012Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) has developed into a key regional security group in Asia, its member states representing no less than “half of humanity”.

    Alarmists believe that the SCO is making itself into a NATO of the East, thus posing a long-term threat to the West. Moreover, several members are key players in economic development and energy production, hence political developments within the SCO can no longer be ignored by the global market. Even so, the organization has long been disregarded by political leaders in the West and is seldom reported in Western media or analysed in academic works. As such, this ground-breaking volume with contributors from across the region and beyond will be a key reference for many specialists and academics working on Asian affairs.

  • 36. Frisk, Sylva
    Submitting to God: Women and Islam in Urban Malaysia2009Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent decades, Malaysia has been profoundly changed by forces of globalization, modernization and industrialization, as well as by a strong Islamization process.  It has been argued, that the position of Malay women in society has worsened.  This study however, challenges that assumption through exploration of the everyday religious practices of pious women within Kuala Lumpur’s affluent, Malay middle class.

    Here, women play an active part in the Islamization process not only through heightened personal religiosity but also by organizing and participating in public programmes of religious education. By organizing new forms of collective ritual and assuming new public roles as religious teachers, these religiously educated women are transforming the traditionally male-dominated gendered space of the mosque and breaking men’s monopoly over positions of religious authority.  This book challenges both preconceptions of the nature of Islamization as well as current theories of female agency and power.

  • 37. Gatu, Dagfinn
    Village China at War: The Impact of Resistance to Japan, 1937-19452011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This groundbreaking study on the forging of Chinese communism in the furnace of the anti-Japanese war focuses on North China, where the CCP first took root and later expanded to conquer China. Whilst the explosive growth of the Chinese Communist movement during the war years is a fact, the nature of this expansion remains disputed. Here the author examines a set of interrelated issues that have so far not received comprehensive treatment with regard to the main Communist base areas in North China – regions where the party secured most of its recruits and where its policy programmes were most severely tested by Japanese military campaigns.

    The analysis centres on how the Party strove to combine two objectives that it perceived as crucial to building up a sustained mass resistance movement to the Japanese: socio-economic and political restructuring in favour of the poor and the forging of a grassroots rural united front including all social strata. The author also stresses the host of severe constraints that the party’s policy ambitions ran up against, such as destruction by the Japanese army, the economic burden of running the resistance, peasant attitudes, and the shortage of trained cadres. Ultimately, the movement spread too rapidly and too wide for the party centre to exert more than a very weak or mediated vanguard function outside scattered enclaves. This in turn allowed localities an autonomous dynamic that often conflicted with higher party echelons. Nevertheless, the movement had a broad, if highly uneven, redistributive impact on power resources in the various fields, leading to a structural fluidity that raised the prospect of a future revolution. History accelerated.

  • 38. Gimpel, Denise
    et al.
    Bailey, Paul
    Creative Spaces: Seeking the Dynamics of Change in China2012Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    China is in flux but - as argued by the contributors to this volume - change is neither new to China nor is it unique to that country; similar patterns are found in other times and in other places. Indeed, on the basis of concrete case studies (ranging from Confucius to the Vagina Monologues, from Protestant missionaries to the Chinese avant-garde) and drawing on theoretical insights from different disciplines, the contributors assert that change may be planned but the outcome can never be predicted with any confidence. Rather, there exist creative spaces within which people, ideas and systems interact with uncertain outcomes.

    As such, by identifying a more sophisticated approach to the complex issues of change, cultural encounters and so-called globalization, this volume not only offers new insights to scholars of other geo-cultural regions; it also throws light on the workings of our ‘global’ and ‘transnational’ lives today, in the past and in the future.

  • 39. Goscha, Christopher E.
    Going Indochinese: Contesting Concepts of Space and Place in French Indochina2012Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Why, Benedict Anderson once asked, did Javanese become Indonesian in 1945 whereas the Vietnamese balked at becoming Indochinese? In this classic study, Goscha shows that Vietnamese of all political colours came remarkably close to building a modern national identity based on the colonial model of Indochina while Lao and Cambodian nationalists rejected this precisely because it represented a Vietnamese entity. Specialists of French colonial, Vietnamese, Southeast Asia and nationalism studies will all find much of value in Goscha’s provocative rethinking of the relationship between colonialism and nationalism in Indochina.

  • 40. Goscha, Christopher E.
    Historical Dictionary of the Indochina War (1945-1954): An International and Interdisciplinary Approach2011Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This first historical dictionary in English of the Indochina War (1945–54) provides the most comprehensive account to date of one of the most important conflicts of the twentieth century. Using over 1,600 personally researched and crafted entries, Goscha provides in-depth, expert coverage of the Indochina War in all its dimensions.

    A succinct historical introduction frames the dictionary. Rather than settling for a strictly politico-military account of the war, the author adopts a path-breaking dual international and interdisciplinary approach. Thus, readers will not only find information on politics and military campaigns; they will also discover the remarkable impact this war had on intellectual, social, cultural, economic and artistic domains in France, Indochina and elsewhere. Indeed, rather than limiting the dictionary to the French and their Vietnamese adversaries, Goscha explores the internationalization of this conflict from its beginning in September 1945 at Ba Dinh square in Hanoi to its end around the Cold War conference table in Geneva in July 1954. Similarly, while most authors focus on the French Fourth Republic and the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, the two main protagonists in this conflict, Goscha makes it clear that a myriad of other non-communist Vietnamese, Lao and Cambodian nationalists were deeply involved in this war and its outcome.

    In addition to its 1,600 entries, the dictionary contains a succinct historical introduction, selected bibliography, maps, illustrations, and tables. A massive work of outstanding scholarly quality and lasting value, this is a reference tool that will be invaluable for researchers, students and anyone else interested to better understand the complexity of this tragic conflict.

     

  • 41. Goscha, Christopher E.
    et al.
    Ivarsson, Søren
    Contesting Visions of the Lao Past: Lao Historiography at the Crossroads2003Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    While the birth of any nation is always more complicated than official historiographies purport, the complex positioning of Laos at the crossroads of a wide range of historical, geographical and cultural currents makes this particularly true. It is well known that Laos’ emergence as a modern nation-state in the 20th century owed much to a complex interplay of internal and external forces.

    This book argues that the historiography of Laos needs also to be understood in this wider context. Not only do the contributors to this volume consider how the Lao have written their own nationalist and revolutionary history ‘on the inside’, they also examine how others – the French, Vietnamese, and Thais – have tried to write the history of Laos ‘from the outside’ for their own political ends. Rather than divorcing these two trends, this book demonstrates that they were inter-linked. Nationalist historiography, like the formation of the nation-state, did not emerge within a nationalist vacuum but was rather contested from the inside and the outside. The volume’s approach has applications and implications far beyond Laos and shows that studying small countries counts.

  • 42. Gravers, Michael
    Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma2007Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    While the image of modern Myanmar/Burma tends to be couched in human rights terms - and especially of a heroic Aung San Suu Kyi opposing an oppressive military regime - in reality there are several conflicts with ethnic and religious dimensions, as well as political and ideological differences between the opposition and the ruling military regime. This is not surprising in a country where 30% of the population and much of the land area are non-Burman, and where contradictory tendencies towards regional separatism versus unitary rule have divided the people since before independence.

    In what is probably the most comprehensive study of Burma’s ethnic minorities to date, this volume discusses the historical formation of ethnic identity and its complexities in relation to British colonial rule as well as to the modern State, the present situation of military rule and its policy of ‘myanmarfication’. Changes of identity in exile and due to religious conversion are analysed and discussed.

    Finally, the book deals with relevant and recent anthropological and sociological theoretical discussions on the ethnic identity, boundaries and space of all the main ethnic groups in Burma. It probes into the complexity and diversity and it provides more details and up-to-date information than previously collected in one volume.

  • 43. Gravers, Mikael
    Burma/Myanmar – Where Now?2014Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent changes in Burma/Myanmar have been called the ‘Burmese democratic spring’. While the international media have mainly focused on the economic opportunities offered by these changes and on the doings and sayings of Aung San Suu Kyi, the reality is far more complex. The country is desperately poor, divided by ethnic and religious rivalries and continues to suffer from some of the world’s most intractable military conflicts while powerful elite factions oppose reform.

    Where, then, is the country heading? What are the key challenges it will face? Who are likely to be the key players in the unfolding events? What implications are there for international actors in arenas like policy, diplomacy, development and business? With contributions on topics like the political situation, international relations, ethnic and religious rivalries, and the economy, long-time observers of the situation offer insights and analysis that address these issues. The result is a tightly focused volume that will appeal to a broad readership interested in the current situation and its implications.

  • 44. Halskov Hansen, Mette
    et al.
    Svarverud, Rune
    iChina: The Rise of the Individual in Modern Chinese Society2010Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Explores the growing individualization permeating all areas of Chinesesocial, economic and political life.

    • Offers a conceptually acute and empirically sensitive analysis.
    • An essential contribution to the current debate in sociology on ‘modernity’.

    In spite of the intense preoccupation with individual and self in modern Western thought, the social sciences have tended to focus on groups and collectives and downplay (even disregard) the individual. This implicit view has also coloured the study of social life in China where both Confucian ethics and Communist policies have shaped collective structures with little room for individual agency and choice.

    What is actually happening, however, is a growingindividualization of China – not only changing perceptions of the individual but also rising expectations for individual freedom, choice and individuality. The individual has also become a basic social category in China, and a development has begun that permeates all areas of social, economic and political life. How this process evolves in a state and society lacking two of the defining characteristics of European individualization – a culturally embedded democracy and a welfare system – is one of the questions that the volume explores.

    A strength of this volume is that its authors succeed in depicting the individualization process in conceptually acute and empirically sensitive terms, and as something with its own distinctively Chinese profile. That makes this book a ‘must read’ for all those wanting to understand present-day Chinese society, with all of its ambivalences, contingencies and contradictions.

    Moreover, the volume makes an essential contribution to the current debate in sociology about how the meaning of ‘modernity’ should be conceptualized and redefined from a cosmopolitan perspective.

     

  • 45. Harriden, Jessica
    The Authority of Influence: Women and Power in Burmese History2012Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This book explores the relationship between gender and power in Burmese history from pre-colonial times to the present day and aims to identify the sources, nature and limitations of women’s power. The study takes as its starting point the apparent contradiction that, though Burmese women historically enjoyed relatively high social status and economic influence, for the most part they remained conspicuously absent from positions of authority in formal religious, social and political institutions. The book thus examines the concept of ‘family’ in Burmese political culture, and reveals how some women were able to gain political influence through their familial connections with powerful men, even while cultural models of ‘correct’ female behaviour prevented most women from attaining official positions of political authority.

    The study also considers how various influences – Buddhism, colonialism, nationalism, modernisation and militarism – shaped Burmese concepts of gender and power, with important implications for how women were able to exercise social, economic and political influence. The book explores how the effects of prolonged armed conflict, economic isolation and political oppression have constrained opportunities for women to attain power in contemporary Burma, and examines opportunities opened up by the pro-democracy movement and recent focus on women's issues and rights for women to exercise influence both inside Burma and in exile.

  • 46. Heimer, Maria
    et al.
    Thøgersen, Stig
    Doing Fieldwork in China2011Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Doing fieldwork inside the PRC is an eye-opening but sometimes also deeply frustrating experience. Fieldwork-based studies form the foundation for our understanding of Chinese politics and society, but there are conspicuously few detailed descriptions in the China literature of how people actually do their fieldwork, and of the problems they encounter. This lack of public methodological debate not only undermines academic standards of openness: it also stalls constructive discussion on coping strategies to shared problems, and it leaves graduate students going to the field for the first time with a feeling of being the only ones to encounter difficulties.

    In this volume scholars from around the world reflect on their own fieldwork practice in order to give practical advice and discuss more general theoretical points. The contributors come from a wide range of disciplines such as political science, anthropology, economics, media studies, history, cultural geography and sinology. The book also contains an extensive bibliography.

    This work is of relevance to post graduate students from the social sciences and humanities who plan to do fieldwork in China; to experienced scholars who are new to the China field; and to experienced China scholars with an interest in methodological issues.

  • 47.
    Helgesen, Geir
    et al.
    Nordiska ministerrådet, NIAS - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies.
    Kim, Uichol
    Good Government: Nordic and East Asian Perspectives2002Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    What is 'good government'? Is it transparent, responsive, small and unobtrusive, or on the contrary, big and active? And is 'good government' the same everywhere, or do regional differences of opinion have to be acknowledged? This short study aims to answer some of these questions by presenting the opinions of 7,127 respondents from China, Denmark, Finland, Japan, Korea and Sweden.

    Surprising results were revealed: within the global political context, the political cultures of East Asia and the Nordic countries have common traits regarding people's expectations of their governments. Unexpectedly, popular control of government is not alien to East Asian political opinion; even more surprisingly is, however, the fact that the moral, paternalistic leadership style so widely accepted in East Asia attracts a positive response in the Nordic countries as well.

    This volume offers a first glimpse of a comprehensive comparative study conducted by the Eurasia Political Culture Research Network (EPCReN) in 1999-2000. This is a pioneer study that aims to spear-head comparative social science research springing from the growing mutual interest between Asia and Europe.

  • 48. Helgesen, Geir
    et al.
    Nielsen, Ras Tind
    Ideas, Society and Politics in Northeast Asia and Northern Europe: Worlds Apart, Learning From Each Other2012Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    This intriguing volume explains why, after centuries of Western scholars studying Asia, Asian scholars are beginning to study Western societies in return.

    Responding to the rise of Nordic studies in China, Japan and Korea, the authors explore how economic success in East Asia is raising issues – like how to deal with an ageing population, income redistribution and provision of social security – that have long been addressed in the Nordic region. Conversely, the Nordic countries have much to learn from the dynamism and flexibility found in East Asia today. Yet, the authors also show how cultural and political differences pose challenges to mutual understanding and learning.

    The essays offer a challenging point of reference for scholars and policy-makers from both regions.

  • 49. Helgesen, Geir
    et al.
    Risbjerg Thomsen, Søren
    Politics, Culture and Self: East Asian and North European Attitudes2011Collection/Antologi (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization may be undermining Kipling’s assertion that “East is East and West is West” but arguably this is more in the realms of technological advances and consumer behaviour than in political culture. In the latter arena, much is still made of the contrasts between Eastern culture (characterized by collectivism and belief in authority) and Western culture (characterized by individualism and belief in democracy). Such comfortable assumptions will be shattered for readers of Politics, Culture and Self.

    This volume indeed confirms that differences between East Asia and Northern Europe do exist. Provocatively, however, it also points to major similarities (e.g. regarding social harmony and the role of the family in society) as well as significant contrasts mirrored within the two regions (e.g. concerning interpersonal and institutional trust).

    These results are of special interest because of the care taken to reduce “cultural contamination”. The data is derived from extensive and in-depth surveys conducted by a cross-cultural research team in East Asia and Northern Europe. Here, methodological techniques were used to control for non-cultural differences as well as cultural variation in how people respond to questionnaires. This survey data is augmented by a wealth of historical and analytical contexts that will make the book an essential item in the library of anyone concerned with issues relating to political behaviour at all levels.

  • 50. Helgesen, Geir
    et al.
    Thelle, Hatla
    Dialogue with North Korea?: Preconditions for Talking Human Rights With a Hermit Kingdom2013Bok (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    There is hardly another country as isolated and with such a bleak image as North Korea. It is portrayed in the Western media as a Hermit Kingdom ruled by an outdated, communist dictatorship whose clandestine nuclear programmes alarm its neighbours and which uses dreadful labour camps to control a population wracked by famine. The regime’s poor track record on human rights is stressed time and again by both Western governments and international organizations.

    Prospects look bleak for any improvement in relations let alone the start of a dialogue on human rights. Offering a rare, nuanced analysis of the North Korean situation, this short study argues that not only is a constructive and fruitful dialogue on human rights possible but also it is desirable for both parties.

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