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  • 1.
    Biong, Stian
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Ravndal, Edle
    National Institute of Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Living in a maze: Health, well-being and coping in young non-western men in Scandinavia experiencing substance abuse and suicidal behaviour2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 4-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to illuminate and interpret the lived experiences of emigration, substance abuse and suicidal behaviour in young non-western men in Scandinavia. The research questions were formulated as: (1) How is meaning constructed in the narratives? (2) What impact do these experiences have on health, well-being and coping? Data were collected using open-ended in-depth interviews. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur, was used to analyse the data. The naïve reading involved awareness of the participants’ perceived sense of insecurity in life. The structural analysis identified three themes: (1) the meaning of getting in a tight spot, (2) the meaning of being in a fog and (3) the meaning of the burning bed. A comprehensive understanding of the data was formulated as “living in a maze”. Ill health involved having a sense of liminality, which impaired one's possibilities to define and re-define goals. Substance abuse and suicidal behaviour were explicit expressions of not being well, when living in a maze that was perceived as closed. Both problem-focused and emotion-focused coping were used by the participants. These provided the motivation for substance abuse and suicidal behaviour.

  • 2.
    Biong, Stian
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Ravndal, Edle
    National Institute of Alcohol and Drug Research, Oslo, Norway.
    Young men's experiences of living with substance abuse and suicidal behaviour: Between death as an escape from pain and the hope of a life2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 246-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to illuminate the experiences of suicidal behaviour in young Norwegian men with long-term substance abuse and to interpret their narratives with regard to meaning. Data were collected using open-ended, in-depth interviews. A phenomenological hermeneutic approach, inspired by the philosophy of Ricoeur, was used to analyse the data. The naïve reading involved awareness of the perceived sense of pain and hope in the participants. In the structural analysis, three themes were identified: (1) the meaning of relating, (2) the meaning of reflecting and (3) the meaning of acting. A comprehensive understanding of data indicated that the meaning of living with suicidal behaviour could be understood as a movement between different positions of wanting death as an escape from pain and hope for a better life. Our conclusion is that suicidal behaviour in men with substance abuse is a communicative activity about the individual's lived experience of pain and hope. How the participants experienced and constructed masculinity influenced the suicidal behaviour. To reduce pain and create hope by being seen and confirmed in social relationships, and being helped to verbalize existential thoughts and openly discuss possible solutions, are of importance.

  • 3.
    Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D.
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    The bodily presence of significant others: Intensive care patients' experiences in a situation of critical illness.2010In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 5, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about intensive care patients and the bodily presence of significant others. The aim of the study is to inquire and understand the patients experience of the body in relation to their significant others during critical illness. Open, unstructured, in-depth interviews with six former intensive care patients provide the data for the study. The phenomenological-hermeneutical analysis points to a theme among ICU patients' experience of conflict between proximity and distance during the bodily presence of their relations. Patients experience different and conflicting forms of responses to the presence of their significant others. Patients experience significant positive confirmation but also negation through this presence. In the ICU situation, the reactions of significant others appear difficult to deal with, yet the physical presence is significant for establishing a sense of affinity. Patients seek to take some responsibility for themselves as well as for their relatives, and are met with a whole spectrum of reactions. Intensive care patients experience the need to be actively, physically present, which often creates sharp opposition between their personal needs and the needs of their significant others for active participation.

  • 4.
    Fredriksen, Sven-Tore D.
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Talseth, Anne Grethe
    Tromsø University College, 9293, Tromsø, Norway.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV. Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden .
    Body, strength and movement*intensive care patients’ experienceof body2008In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 3, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about intensive care patients’ experience of strength, body and movement during critical illness in an intensivecare unit. The aim of the study is to inquire and understand the ways the body and its experience appear when thephenomena of strength and movement are altered. The data were collected through in-depth interviews with seven patientsand analysed from a phenomenological-hermeneutical point of view. The findings showed a body that refuses to cooperateand is often marginally able to cope with the situation at all. It showed relational bonding between the patients and healthpersonnel and/or significant others where the patients were overlooked and at the same time dependent on the same persons.They were waving between life and death through dimension of existence, which is contrasted to earlier experiences. Theyshowed feeling responsible for the family through a role in to reduce their fears. At the same time, they are in a continuousstruggle for life in which they balance between vague hope and a situation so challenging that the only thing left is grimhumour. They showed progressing and expectations where the slightest changes in the situation in a positive direction createa hope in them.

  • 5.
    Häggblom, Anette
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Fighting for survival and escape from violence: Interviews with battered womenRead More2007In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 169-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study is a qualitative study aiming at explaining and understanding the experience of being battered. It explores the act of searching for help, from the health service and others, and the ending of abusive relationships. In-depth interviews were conducted with nine battered women. The study adopted a grounded theory method and produced an emerging core category fighting for survival and escape, and three key categories: having a personal construct of violence, struggling to cope with the violence, and feeling a need for support. The women with deep internal scars struggled to understand and to recover from the violence. They struggled between feeling guilty and feeling innocent. In the process of leaving, an important other, often a friend, played a supportive role in creating an inner strength within the woman, which enabled her to break up. Supportive professionals found relevant solutions and helped the women to maintain their new situation, while other professionals re-victimized the women. We conclude that battered women with enhanced support include affirmation, information, and safety leading to increased survival and recover

  • 6.
    Mahler, Marianne
    et al.
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Sarvimäki, Anneli
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic School of Public Health NHV.
    Appetite and falls: Old age and lived experiences.2012In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Falling among older adults is a well-known public health problem but the association between falling and appetite is seldom studied although poor nutritional status is accepted as a risk factor for falls. On this background the aim of this study was to understand how older adults, who have fallen several times within a year, related their experiences of appetite as a phenomenon in everyday life. In narrative in-depth interviews, eight women and four men contributed with their stories. Using interpretative phenomenology the thematic analysis resulted in three main themes: appetite for food; appetite for social relations and appetite for influence. Eating was not trivial everyday routine and required self-regimentation. Meals were not an object of desire, but of discipline out of the wish to survive. Feelings, reflections and ambivalence were bound to the lack of appetite on food. The participants were oriented towards the forbidden, the delicious and to everyday food as a strengthener and as medicine. In their dependency on help, home was the framework for establishing social relations as means of social support. As well as family and neighbours, the significant others were persons on whom the participants were dependent. Personal relationships and mutual dependencies may ensure social security in lives characterised by contingency and maintain influence in daily life. Falling is both a dramatic and a trivial incident where life and death could be at stake. From this perspective, connectedness was prominent in all fall stories. The quest for influence and a sense of social connectedness was the incentive to re-enter local community arenas and to express solidarity. In health-care practice multi-factorial fall-prevention should be complemented with a multi-dimensional approach in order to balance the medical approach with humanistic and societal approaches towards fall-prevention.

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