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  • 1. Andersen, Peter B.
    et al.
    Soren, Santosh K.
    The Bodo of Assam: Revisiting a Classical Study from 19502015Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Bodo (or Boros) are one of the indigenous tribal peoples of Assam. During colonial times they resisted Christianization and in recent decades they have been involved both in interethnic violence and separatist insurgencies. Much research has gone into understanding the Boros and their aspirations but an issue has been that earlier accounts of this once-animist people are meagre and date from the colonial period. The rediscovery and publication of the ethnographic material based on fieldwork carried out by Halfdan Siiger among the Boros in 1949–50 is thus hugely important. Siiger’s manuscript is unique, offering detailed descriptions of the social and ritual life of the Boros and new insights into the traditions and myths as they were told in the village he studied before the transformation of religious life in recent decades. Thanks to Siiger’s diligent translation and interpretation, the manuscript also preserves a number of ritual formulas and songs in the Boro language. Siiger’s manuscript is given even greater relevance by the inclusion of more recent material contributed by the editors and other contemporary scholars. In addition, his original photos are augmented by new photos from the village and by rare images from the collections of the National Museum of Denmark. 

  • 2. Bangsbo, Ellen
    Teaching and Learning in Tibet: A Review of Research Policy Publications2006Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The issue of schooling and education for Tibetan children in the Tibetan Autonomous Region (TAR) is the focus of increasing national and international attention. Here, special attention has been given to the concept of ‘quality education’. One should be aware that this concept is understood differently by different groups. Educationalists and NGOs with programmes in Tibet view ‘quality education’ from the international perspective of methodology and pedagogy; here, the aim is to teach children to think independently. In contrast, Chinese authorities promote ‘quality education’ as an antidote to ‘exam-oriented education’ and as a means to support nationalistic, patriotic and moral education. The challenge is to bridge these two views.

    To this end, Teaching and Learning in Tibet provides an unbiased and comprehensive guide to documents and publications on schooling and education in Tibet dealing with issues relating to ‘quality education’, teaching and curriculum, bi- and trilingual teaching policies, teachers’ education, ‘key-schools’, access to school, and other challenges related to schooling in Tibet.

  • 3. Bankoff, Greg
    et al.
    Swart, Sandra
    Breeds of Empire: The ’Invention’ of the Horse in Southeast Asia and Southern Africa 1500-19502011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ships of empire carried not just merchandise, soldiers and administrators but also equine genes from as far a field as Europe, Arabia, the Americas, China and Japan. In the process, they introduced horses into parts of the world not native to that animal in historical times. As a result, horses in Thailand, the Philippine Horses, the Cape Horse in South Africa and the Basotho Pony in the mountain kingdom of Lesotho share a genetic lineage with the horse found in the Indonesian archipelago.

    This book explores the ‘invention’ of specific breeds of horse in the context of imperial design and colonial trade routes. Here, it focuses on the introduction, invention and use of the horse in Thailand, the Philippines and southern Africa as well as examining its roots and evolution within Indonesia. In addition, it examines the colonial trade in horses within the Indian Ocean and discusses the historiographical and methodological problems associated with writing a more species or horse-centric history.

    This is a fascinating study that will appeal not only to scholars but also to the broad horse-reading public interested in all things equine.

  • 4. Becker, John
    Pattern and Loom: A Practical Study of the Development of Weaving Techniques in China, Western Asia and Europe2014Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When John Becker’s Pattern and Loom was posthumously published in 1987, the work was hailed as an important work that revealed much new knowledge on the development of weaving techniques across the centuries from China through to Europe. The key to the book’s almost forensic investigation of its subject was the author himself, a Danish damask weaver with a lifetime’s practical experience in his craft and an intimate knowledge of weaving techniques that allowed him to decipher, experiment and interpret original techniques from small remnants of surviving material. Long out of print, the work has been tidied and reset by Becker’s collaborator on the original work, the sinologist Don Wagner.

     

  • 5. Boshier, Carol-Anne
    Mapping Cultural Nationalism: The Scholars of the Burma Society, 1910-19352018 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the proscription of public political debates under colonial rule in Burma, boundary-crossing ventures like the Burma Research Society (founded in 1910) allowed those from different racial and cultural backgrounds to engage in debates about national belonging and identity. At the same time their scholarship generated new historical and cultural knowledge. Such social and intellectual interactions sowed the seeds of nascent nationalism in Burma, not least a unifying Burmano-Buddhist hegemony as promoted by BRS members like J.S. Furnivall and his circle. This was contested by the regional nationalism of San Shwe Bu, with Leslie Fernandes Taylor also warning of the consequences of neglecting the ethnic and linguistic diversity of Burma’s many races. With the rise of Rangoon University and popular culture and militant nationalism coming to dominate the social and political landscape by the mid-1930s, the influence of the BRS began to wane. This detailed study of the BRS and its membership, together with an analysis of its published output, contextualizes the Society within its metropolitan and regional setting, as well as drawing on a broader, transnational intellectual landscape. This timely work on the Society’s intellectual legacy has the potential to inform current debates in Myanmar at a time when the activities of ultra-nationalist groups threaten other religions and ethnicities’ rights as citizens.

  • 6.
    Bruun, Ole
    Nordic Council of Ministers, NIAS - Nordic Institute of Asian Studies.
    Fengshui in China: Geomantic Divination between State, Orthodoxy and Popular Religion2011 (ed. 2nd ed.)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For well over a century, Chinese fengshui - or 'geomancy' - has interested Western laymen and scholars. Today, hundreds of popular manuals claim to use its principles in their advice on how people can increase their wealth, happiness, longevity, etc. This study is quite different, approaching fengshui from an academic angle. The focus is on fengshui's significance in China, but the recent history of its reinterpretation in the West is also depicted.

    The author argues that fengshui serves as an alternative tradition of cosmological knowledge, which is used to explain a range of everyday occurrences in rural areas such as disease, mental disorders, accidents and common mischief. Although Chinese authorities have opposed the tradition for centuries, nonetheless it has been used by almost everyone as an aspect of popular cosmology. Opposing the Chinese collectivist ethos and moralizing from above, fengshui represents an alternative vision of reality, while interpreting essential Chinese values in a way that sanctions selfish motivations and behaviour.

    The study includes a historical account of fengshui over the last 150 years augmented by the results of anthropological fieldwork on contemporary practices in two Chinese rural areas. Aiming to eschew Western intellectual preconceptions and to penetrate the confused mass of old texts and divergent local practices, the book will be of interest to all scholars seeking to understand an undercurrent of modern China's transformation.

  • 7. Charney, Michael
    et al.
    Wellen, Kathryn
    Warring Societies of Pre-Colonial Southeast Asia: Local Cultures of Conflict Within a Regional Context2018 (ed. 1st)Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Why is it that warfare in Southeast Asian history is depicted so differently in various historical sources and representations? Why have scholars looking at different countries found so many exceptions to regional overviews of warfare? The present volume seeks to present a new approach to the study of warfare in the region by abandoning the generalizations made in the conventional literature. The contributors offer a range of new studies of warfare in local areas within the region, looking at warfare on its own, local terms rather than for what it says about warfare in the region as a whole.   This approach for the first time submits Southeast Asia to comparative analysis in a way that avoids artificial and misleading regional attributes. The varied case studies, researched and written by a number of experts of local warfare within the region include naval warfare eighteenth century Vietnam, civil war in South Sulawesi during the Pénéki War, the art and texts of war in Burmese warfare, modes of warfare in precolonial Bali, war captive taking in Thailand, and kinship, religion, and war in late eighteenth century Maguindanao, and preparations for war in the Pacific rimlands. The volume makes an important contribution to the new literature emerging on the culture of indigenous warfare in North and South America, Africa, South Asia, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands, by offering a new and robust Southeast Asian entry on the one hand while adding to a new approach to the growing literature on early modern Southeast Asia warfare.

  • 8. Christensen, Asger
    Aiding Afghanistan: The Background and Prospects for Reconstruction in a Fragmented Society1995Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Examines how the structure and dynamics of Afghan society shaped not only earlier relations between state and society but also the resistance struggle and civil war, and still affect international efforts towards the country's reconstruction.

  • 9. Couderc, Pascal
    et al.
    Sillander, Kenneth
    Ancestors in Borneo Societies: Death, Transformation, and Social Immortality2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While death, eschatology and exotic indigenous deathways have long held a privileged position in the ethnographic and popular literature on Borneo, ancestors have remained a strangely neglected topic. This volume fills this lacuna by presenting a collection of essays on ancestors in Borneo societies written by anthropologists with extensive experience in the field and drawing on new scholarship in kinship and animism studies.

    Belying the unimportance of ancestors in the literature, the essays document a complex significance of ancestors in Borneo religion and social life. Ancestors appear in a variety of manifestations and contexts, including as guests or distant beneficiaries of offerings in mortuary and community rituals, as village guardians and personal protecting spirits, as assistants in curing rituals and warfare, as unsolicited visitors in dreams and involuntary possession, and as sources of political authority, cultural legitimacy, and collective identity in public discourse. The pattern of relating to ancestors that emerges from this close collaborative effort differs from classic ethnographic representations of ancestor worship based on Sino-African material, and broadens the theoretical and comparative understanding of the subject.

    Exploring at depth complex questions about the constitution of ancestorship and how ancestral status is established – and the role in this regard of death, kinship, prowess, morality and ritual – this volume will not just be of interest to regional specialists but also will enrich the general anthropological theory of ancestors, kinship and religion.

  • 10.
    Engman, Riikka
    Nordic Council of Ministers, Nordic Culture Point.
    Focus Projects: Effects and Results of Funding2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 11. Falk, Monica Lindberg
    Making Fields of Merit: Buddhist Female Ascetics and Gendered Orders in Thailand2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Religion plays a central role in Thai society with Buddhism intertwined in the daily lives of the people. Religion also plays an important role in establishing gender boundaries. The growth in recent decades of self-governing nunneries (samnak chii) and the increasing interest of Thai women in a Buddhist monastic life are notable changes in the religion–gender dynamic.

    This anthropological study addresses religion and gender relations through the lens of the lives, actions and role in Thai society of an order of Buddhist nuns (mae chii). It presents an unique ethnography of these Thai Buddhist nuns, examines what it implies to be a female ascetic in contemporary Thailand and analyses how the ordained state for women fits into the wider gender patterns found in Thai society. The study also deals with the nuns’ agency in creating religious space and authority for women. In addition, it raises questions about how the position of Thai Buddhist nuns outside the Buddhist sangha affects their religious legitimacy and describes recent moves to restore a Theravada order of female monks.

     

  • 12. Gravers, Michael
    Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Burma2007Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While the image of modern Myanmar/Burma tends to be couched in human rights terms - and especially of a heroic Aung San Suu Kyi opposing an oppressive military regime - in reality there are several conflicts with ethnic and religious dimensions, as well as political and ideological differences between the opposition and the ruling military regime. This is not surprising in a country where 30% of the population and much of the land area are non-Burman, and where contradictory tendencies towards regional separatism versus unitary rule have divided the people since before independence.

    In what is probably the most comprehensive study of Burma’s ethnic minorities to date, this volume discusses the historical formation of ethnic identity and its complexities in relation to British colonial rule as well as to the modern State, the present situation of military rule and its policy of ‘myanmarfication’. Changes of identity in exile and due to religious conversion are analysed and discussed.

    Finally, the book deals with relevant and recent anthropological and sociological theoretical discussions on the ethnic identity, boundaries and space of all the main ethnic groups in Burma. It probes into the complexity and diversity and it provides more details and up-to-date information than previously collected in one volume.

  • 13. Heimer, Maria
    et al.
    Thøgersen, Stig
    Doing Fieldwork in China2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Doing fieldwork inside the PRC is an eye-opening but sometimes also deeply frustrating experience. Fieldwork-based studies form the foundation for our understanding of Chinese politics and society, but there are conspicuously few detailed descriptions in the China literature of how people actually do their fieldwork, and of the problems they encounter. This lack of public methodological debate not only undermines academic standards of openness: it also stalls constructive discussion on coping strategies to shared problems, and it leaves graduate students going to the field for the first time with a feeling of being the only ones to encounter difficulties.

    In this volume scholars from around the world reflect on their own fieldwork practice in order to give practical advice and discuss more general theoretical points. The contributors come from a wide range of disciplines such as political science, anthropology, economics, media studies, history, cultural geography and sinology. The book also contains an extensive bibliography.

    This work is of relevance to post graduate students from the social sciences and humanities who plan to do fieldwork in China; to experienced scholars who are new to the China field; and to experienced China scholars with an interest in methodological issues.

  • 14. Hellman, Jörgen
    Performing the Nation: Cultural Politics in New Order Indonesia2003Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In sharp contrast to today’s disorder was the apparent cohesion and stability of Indonesia during much of the New Order period (1965–98). While Suharto’s authoritarian rule was significant, the regime’s cultural policies also played their part. Ethnic, religious and regional sentiments were to be channelled into the field of art rather than being expressed in terms of class, religion or separatism. At the same time, culture was used to help develop a national Indonesian identity.

    This theme is explored by this study, which focuses on the efforts of a group of young art students based at the Bandung Academy of Performing Arts to revitalize traditional Longser theatre. The interaction between the artists and regime and their often-differing ideas about identity, the role of art and cultural traditions in Indonesia offers valuable insights into the underlying dynamics of the country’s current condition.

  • 15. Kent, Alexandra
    Divinity and Diversity: A Hindu Revitalization Movement in Malaysia2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A timely and relevant study in this age of concern about trans-national ’religious’ networks where powerful use of ethnographic date illuminates an original and striking thesis on the ambiguous nature of the Sai Baba movement. What makes this work outstanding is how the author places her material against the complex ethnic, political and religious situation of Malaysia. The book looks closely at the Malaysian following of the contemporary Indian godman Sathya Sai Baba, a neo-Hindu guru famed for his miracle-working.

    The ’911’ attacks on the United States and subsequent ’war on terrorism’ have brought a discussion of transnational ’religious’ networks onto centre stage. While the Sai Baba movement has no militaristic ideology, it may - like any other such movement - ultimately call into question the sovereignty of the nation state.

    Today, then, issues of faith and devotion are more urgent than ever in the interfaces between diverse world-views, not only at local and national levels but, increasingly, at the global level as well.

  • 16. Kirketerp, Anne
    et al.
    Bak, Margrete
    Buus, Marianne
    Entreprenørskab og foretagsomhed i de kunstneriske uddannelser i Norden2015Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [da]

    Denne rapport, udført af Kirketerp, Buus og Bak for KreaNord i 2011, ønsker at bidrage til, at studerende på de kunstneriske uddannelser i Norden styrkes i deres forudsætninger for at kunne omsætte deres kreative og kunstneriske kompetencer til et bæredygtigt arbejdsliv. Rapporten er rettet mod besluttende myndigheder, uddannelsesansvarlige og undervisere og kan styrke både interesse og viden, samt motivere handling. Rapporten giver definitioner indenfor entreprenørskab, metoder, cases, samt en model, som beskriver handlingsmål og tilrettelæggelse i entreprenørskabsundervisning.

    Genudgivet i 2015 i forbindelse med afviklingen af KreaNord, Nordisk Ministerråds initiativ om kulturelle og kreative erhverv (2008–2015).

  • 17. Knudsen, Are
    Violence and Belonging: Land, Love and Lethal Conflict in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan2011Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Honour and violence is a major theme in the anthropology of the Middle East, yet – apart from political violence – most studies approach violence from the perspective of honour.

    By contrast, this important study examines the meanings of lethal conflict in a little-studied tribal society in Pakistan’s unruly North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) and offers a new perspective on its causes. Based on an in-depth study of local conflicts, the book challenges stereotyped images of a region and people miscast as extremist and militant. Being grounded in local ethnography enables the book to shed light on the complexities of violence, not only at the structural or systemic level, but also as experienced by the men involved in lethal conflict. In this way, the book provides a subjective and experiential approach to violence that is applicable beyond the field locality and relevant for advancing the study of violence in the Middle East and South Asia.

  • 18. Kværne, Per
    et al.
    Thargyal, Rinzin
    Bon, Buddhism and Democracy: The Building of a Tibetan National Identity1993Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whereas the old independent Tibet was based on a Buddhist theocratic order, what is increasingly seen today is a growing national awareness. This perhaps explains moves are being made to create a plural society embracing the faiths and ethnic and social

  • 19. Olivová, Lucie
    et al.
    Børdahl, Vibeke
    Lifestyle and Entertainment in Yangzhou2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yangzhou, once the central place of literati and urban culture, is still one of the most important centres of traditional culture in China today. Over the years particular regional forms of art and entertainment have arisen here, some surviving into the present time.

    This beautifully illustrated volume celebrates Yangzhou’s rich cultural tradition through a well-balanced spectrum of topics spanning the period from the late 17th century to modern times. These are grouped into four thematic parts: Yangzhou’s cultural heritage during historic downfalls and revivals; regional literature and book production; local theatre and storytelling; and various artists of the 18th-century Yangzhou School of Painting. Within each thematic part, descriptions and evaluations of cultural phenomena are supplemented with reflections on lifestyle and customs, weaving a virtual dialogue that binds the topical diversity of the collection tightly together.

  • 20. Ovesen, Jan
    et al.
    Trankell, Ing-Britt
    Cambodians and Their Doctors: A Medical Anthropology of Colonial and Post-Colonial Cambodia2010Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At face value, this book is about medicine in Cambodia over the last hundred years. At the same time, however, by using ‘medicine’ (in the sense of ideas, practices and institutions relating to health and illness) as a prism through which to view colonial and post-colonial Cambodian society more generally, it offers an historical and contemporary anthropology of the nation ofCambodia.

    Rich in ethnographic detail derived from both contemporary anthropological fieldwork and colonial archival material, the study is an account of the simultaneous presence in Cambodia of two medical traditions: the modern, biomedical one first introduced by the French colonial power at the turn of the twentieth century, and the indigenous Khmer health cosmology. In their reliance on one or the other of the two traditions, to a large extent the Khmer people have been concerned to find efficient medical treatment that also adheres to social norms (not least the emphasis on the morality of social relations). This concern is also evident in the prevailing medical pluralism in Cambodia today.

    The authors trace the interaction (and lack thereof) between these two traditions from the French colonial period via the political upheavals of the 1970s through to the present day. The result is more than a medical anthropology; this is a key text that also makes a significant contribution to the anthropological study of Cambodian society at large and will be an important resource for development planners and aid workers in medical and related fields.

  • 21. Sakhong, Lian H.
    In Search of Chin Identity: A Study in Religion, Politics and Ethnic Identity in Burma2003Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Prior to British annexation in 1896, Chinram was an independent country ruled by traditional tribal and local chiefs. Annexation saw the land divided between India and Burma and Chin society abruptly transformed, not least by the arrival of Christian missionaries. The conversion of the Chin to Christianity from traditional locally based Chin religion had unintended consequences as the Chin became involved in Burmese independence movements. They began to articulate their own Christian traditions of democracy and assert a burgeoning self-awareness of their own national identity. Moreover, the church has taken a key role in the struggle of Chin liberation movements in Burma and India. Just how Christianity has provided the Chin people with a means of preserving their national identity in the midst of multi-ethnic and multi-religious environments is the main focus of this study.

    Written by an exiled former Secretary General of the Chin National League for Democracy, this study contains valuable data on the Chin and their role in the history of Burma, and provides a clear analysis of the close relationship between religion, ethnicity and nationalism.

  • 22. Sercombe, Peter
    et al.
    Sellato, Bernard
    Beyond the Green Myth: Borneo’s Hunter-Gatherers in the Twenty-First Century2011Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Borneo with its tales of White Rajahs and tribes of headhunters, has long excited the Western imagination. Today, however, there is another green imagination at work. Mention of the island is more likely to evoke images of tropical deforestation and concern about the cruel dispossession and displacement of indigenous peoples who once lived in relative harmony with their environment.

    It is perhaps not surprising then that most books dealing with the nomadic hunter-gatherers of Borneo have principally been pictorial studies. There is indeed a dearth of scholarship regarding these peoples, a situation that this first ever, comprehensive review of nomadic groups in the Borneo rain forest aims to rectify.

    Presenting a wealth of new research contributed by an international team of scholars the volume covers all those parts of Borneo where nomads (called Penan, Punan or by various other names) are or were known to exist and provides a comparative historical-ecological study of these groups.

    The study is primarily concerned with issues of modernization (including the monetary economy formalised institutions centralized power structures, contractual relationships and extraction activities) and development policies. The impact of these policies is analysed with special regard to the natural environment inhabited by these small-scale societies as well as the use of its resources.

  • 23.
    Stopniece, Santa
    University of Jyväskylä.
    “Opportunities, but Nothing Very Concrete”: The Challenge Finns Face with Chinese Delegations’ General Level of Interest in Finland2015In: Asia in Focus: A Nordic journal on Asia by early career researchers, ISSN 2446-0001, no 1, p. 23-29Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the challenge of finding common ground between the Finns and the Chinese in the context of co-operation, trade and inward investment facilitation related to general lack of specific interest displayed by the Chinese. The article is ethnographic in nature and is mainly based on data obtained from interviewing individuals working for local governments in Finland and one of the state agencies responsible for attracting foreign investment. The study uses Speech Codes Theory (Philipsen, 1997) when analyzing the cultural aspects of expectations regarding communication between Chinese and Finns. According to interviewees, lack of serious interest, vague government guidelines, the longer time needed to build relationship, and involvement of intermediaries all contribute to the difficulty to move the discussions to a more specific level of focus. Finnish expectations regarding this type of communication are that it should be direct and task-oriented, because they feel pressure to yield real results quickly and efficiently. Suggested strategies to make the co-operation talks more specific are presenting the expertise areas of Finland, clarification regarding too general terms used by the Chinese, and investing into building personal relationships with them.

  • 24. Tayanin, Damrong
    et al.
    Lindell, Kristina
    Évrard, Olivier
    Fiskesjö, Magnus
    Hunting and Fishing in a Kammu Village: Revisiting a Classic Study in Southeast Asian Ethnography2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This detailed and fascinating description of traditional hunting, trapping and fishing in northern Laos includes illustrations of traps, weapons, etc., an insight into rites and taboos pertaining to the work, and much more. First published in 1991 and quickly out of print, the book was hailed as ‘an outstanding contribution to Southeast Asian ethnography … [It] is highly recommended not only for specialists in traditional hunting and fishing but also for those readers who wish to gain some insight “from the native’s point of view” into a fascinating tribal minority culture of highland Southeast Asia’ (Roland Mischung, Asian Folklore Studies). The book’s vivid descriptions and illustrations were especially praised.  Over the years, the two authors wrote several books together, often with other partners. In this instance, the major contribution is by Damrong Tayanin, drawing on his earlier life as a Kammu farmer and hunter.

    This reproduction of Hunting and Fishing is augmented by new material on food cultivation and its preparation among the Kammu by Kàm Ràw (Damrong Tayanin) together with essays by Håkan Lundström, Olivier Évrard and Magnus Fiskesjö.

  • 25. Voetmann, Per
    et al.
    Goldin, Angela
    Mäenpää, Marjo
    McAtackney, Laura
    Rekola, Sanna
    Lind, Ulrika
    Culture and sustainability2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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