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Chapter 1. Being played in everyday life: Massive data collection on mobile games as part of ludocapitalist surveillance dispositif
Department of Social and Public Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7680-6591
Department of Social and Public Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0640-0139
Department of Social and Public Communication, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada.
Responsible organisation
2023 (English)In: Everyday Life in the Culture of Surveillance / [ed] L. Samuelsson, C. Cocq, S. Gelfgren, & J. Enbom, Nordicom, University of Gothenburg , 2023, p. 21-44Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Surveillance in videogames is a well-known phenomenon. Designated as the fastest-growing sector of the videogame industry, mobile games – particularly free-to-play games – capitalise substantially on the collection of user data. Based on the promise of offering personalised gaming and advertising experiences, a vast quantity of data, including personal identifier and geolocation data, is acquired through players’ mobile devices. While the information obtained may appear fragmented or invisible to players, they are consolidated in the hands of data brokers, resulting in a very lucrative economic sector. From this perspective, the practice of the mobile game, although innocuous at first consideration, raises essential ethical questions regarding the ludocapitalist surveillance dispositif established by this industry. In this chapter, we seek to problematise everyday surveillance in mobile gaming, explain how the videogame and marketing industries operate it, and examine gamers’ (“ordinary” citizens) involvement in the banalisation of this massive data gathering. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nordicom, University of Gothenburg , 2023. p. 21-44
Keywords [en]
ludocapitalism, mobile games, free-to-play, surveillance capitalism, Foucauldian dispositif
National Category
Media Studies
Research subject
Media
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:norden:org:diva-12798DOI: 10.48335/9789188855732-1ISBN: 978-91-88855-72-5 (print)ISBN: 978-91-88855-73-2 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:norden-12798DiVA, id: diva2:1746818
Note

This research was conducted within the “Canada Research Chair on Big Data and Gaming Communities” and was funded by the Canadian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC).

Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2023-03-29

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